Tag Archives: wealth

Ex-NFL player, Mega Millions winner press $7.8M claims against Morgan Stanley

What do sports super-stars and lottery winners have in common?  Both are in financial danger.

That’s a strange thing to say about people who are often multi-millionaires.

The problem is that neither the talented athlete nor the lottery winner is usually any good at managing money.  That’s a harsh judgment to make but too many star athletes and lottery winners end up broke.  They end up broke for many of the same reasons:

  • They believe that the financial windfall they have received is inexhaustible.
  • They attract too many groupies and hangers-on who are after their money.
  • They spend the money they have received instead of investing it for their old age.
  • The money they do invest is often lost because of poor, or dishonest, advice.

From Financial Planning magazine:

Former NFL cornerback Asante Samuel and Mega Millions lottery winner James Groves are jointly seeking $7.8 million in damages against Morgan Stanley related to investment recommendations made by a now-barred broker, according to regulatory filings….

Samuel and Groves filed their claims in FINRA arbitration in July, according to a copy of Parthemer’s CRD. From 2003 to 2013, Samuel played for several NFL teams, including the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles. Groves won $168 million in the Mega Millions lottery in 2009.

In this case, Asante Samuel was persuaded to buy a night club, probably hoping to capitalize on his fame as a football player.  It’s fairly common for professional athletes to open restaurants or night clubs.  The problem is that even for professional restauranteurs, the failure rate is shockingly high, and athletes don’t have the training or time to run these businesses.

The story of many lottery winners is one example of ruined lives after another.   Bud Post’s story is not unusual.

When William “Bud” Post won $16.2 million in a 1988 lottery, one of the first things he did was try to please his family, according to this Bankrate article.

Unfortunately, his kin was of the unfriendly sort. Post’s brother hired a hit man to kill him, hoping to inherit some money. Other family members persuaded him to invest in two businesses that ultimately failed. Post’s ex-girlfriend sued him for some of the winnings. Post himself was thrown in jail for firing a gun at a bill collector.

Over time, Post accumulated so much debt that he had to declare bankruptcy. He now relies on Social Security for income. “Lotteries don’t mean (anything) to me,” he is quoted as saying—after he lost all his money.

Is there no hope for professional athletes and lottery winners?  Yes, but it requires them to know their limitations, which may include hiring professional help before they begin spending their new-found wealth.

If you’re a sports star or lottery winner who would like to retire rich, and you want to have someone to talk to about the way you can fend off the vultures that your wealth and fame attract, contact us.  You don’t want to spend your time in court trying to get back what you lost.

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Is bigger really better?

Korving -1016 RET web

Everyone wants to see their business grow.  That’s true whether you own a small restaurant or an investment firm.  Some investors look at the size of the firm as an indication of the quality of the advice they will get, assuming that bigger is better.

But that is often the opposite of what they will experience.  Most people are aware that some of the best restaurants are small, with just a few tables, catering to a select clientele.  For the same reason, small investment firms are often better for their clients than large firms.

Large firms are the training ground for smaller firms.  Large firms recruit people who have no experience as investment managers and train them in selling their company’s products.  Once a financial advisor gains experience, he sees ways that his clients can be served better.  That’s the point at which he forms his own small firm where clients get the benefit of his knowledge and experience.

Clients who do business with small firms typically deal directly with the owners, who work for them, rather than employees who work for a paycheck.  As everyone knows, it makes a lot of difference when you’re dealing with the owner of a business rather than an employee.

Small firms are more flexible in meeting the needs of individuals.  Everyone is not the same.  Everyone has a different set of experiences, a different array of needs, and seeks a different level of service.  Large firms create policies and procedures that stack people in silos and try to impose uniform rules on everyone.  The larger the organization, the greater the need for uniformity and the less the business cares about any one individual.

If you have an investment portfolio worth a million dollars, an investment firm with assets-under-management (AUM) of $100 million will care about you and do its best to address your needs.  A firm with  AUM of $1 billion dollars will not care about you as an individual, you’re a statistic.

Korving & Company is growing Registered Investment Firm (RIA), but doing so in a way that makes sure that we always know our clients, care about them as individuals, and go out of our way to meet their individual needs.

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Buy a Paper Mill Heiress’s Greenwich Mansion for $5.5 Million

The seven-bedroom house sits on 10 acres.

 

Having recently inherited her mother’s house in the same community, Zelinsky is selling her old home for $5.495 million. The buyer of the 6,100-square-foot house (that measurement doesn’t include a partially finished basement) will benefit from Zelinsky’s family’s connection to the property and its surroundings.

 

Just in case you wanted to know what you could get if you had the money.  The grounds need some work.

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Would You Prefer to Have $1 Million Cash Right Now or a Penny that Doubles Every Day for 30 Days?

Albert Einstein is credited with saying “compound interest is the eighth wonder of the world.”

To get back to the original question, would you prefer to have $1 million today or one cent that will double every day for 30 days?  If you chose the million dollars, you would leave millions on the table.

If you chose the penny and passed up the million dollars, on the second day your penny would be worth two cents, on day three it would be four cents, on the fourth day it would be 8 cents.  By day 18 the penny will have grown to $1,310.72.  By day 28 it will be worth over a million dollars:  $1,342,177.  On the 30th day it would be worth an astounding $5,368,709!

If the penny were to be allowed to double for another 30 days, the penny would grow to over $5 quadrillion (five thousand trillion!) dollars.

One of the things this illustrates is that compound growth takes time to make a dramatic difference.  For the person who wants to have enough money to retire in comfort, starting early is the key to success, even if the starting amount is small.

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Living like the Earls of Downton Abbey

Want to live in grand country house in the English country side?

Some of these homes have been divided in apartments.  Here’s Apley Park.

 

 

Mr. Wentworth’s six-bedroom apartment, set over three south-facing floors, is one of 17 units on the property and located in the main building, called Library House.

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Changes in tax law create problems for trusts

The Federal Estate Tax was created in 1916 to help pay for World War 1.  The tax is levied on everything you own or have interests in at your death.  At first, it did not apply to many people but inflation and prosperity began taking its toll.  From 1987 to 1997 the government tax on estates over $600,000 was 55%.

By then, many people who owned a nice home and had savings and investments became worried that a lot of their money want going to go to the government rather than their heirs.  Each person has his or her own exemption.  A married couple has two exemptions.  However, if one died, leaving everything to the spouse, the surviving spouse only had one exemption left.

The legal profession came up with an answer: the A/B Trust otherwise known as the “spousal” and the”family” trust.  Under current law, you can leave an unlimited amount of money to your spouse free of tax.  But you can leave up to $600,000 to a trust that your spouse can use for his or her benefit but is not legally their property.  This is known as the “family trust.”  The rest goes directly to the spouse or to a “spousal trust.”

Then when the surviving spouse dies, the heirs inherit both the “family trust” assets ($600,000) and the surviving spouse (or “spousal trust”) assets up to the $600,000 limit – for a total of $1,200,000 free of federal estate tax.

At a tax rate of 55%, that saves the heirs a whopping $330,000 in taxes.  Everyone thought that was a great idea.  Many estate plans and trust documents were prepared with these issues in mind.  There were some drawbacks with these plans but the estate tax savings overwhelmed all other considerations.

Beginning in 1988 the amount of the exemption that could be passed on to non-spousal heirs was gradually increased.  In 2000 it went to $1,000,000 and for one year – 2010 – there was no estate tax at all.  In 2012 the law was changed and the limit was raised to $5 million and indexed for inflation.  In 2016 the estate tax exemption is $5.45 million and the estate tax rate is 40%.

This means that a lot fewer people will be subject to the estate tax and now are faced with the negative aspects of this approach to estate planning. These include

  • Inconvenience
  • Administrative costs
  • Capital gains taxes

We will address these issues in our next essay.

Questions?  Call us.

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Independent Wealth Managers vs. Wirehouses

If you had the choice, would you rather shop at a boutique or a chain store?  You know what you get at a chain store: pre-packaged products on shelves that meet most of your needs but no personal service.  A boutique provides you with a lot more product selection, a high level of personal service and saves you time in meeting your needs.

The reason that so many people go to chain stores for groceries, hardware and clothing is that they usually offer lower prices. The interesting thing about the financial services industry is that the “chain stores” (the industry calls them “wirehouses”) like Merrill Lynch, UBS, Wells Fargo are not cheaper than financial boutiques.

These boutiques go by other names such as “Registered Investment Advisors” (RIAs) or “Independent Wealth Managers.”   But they are all focused on satisfying their customers, not on the sale.  They are true servants to their customers.  While wirehouses give the impression of size, the are limited to selling the products they have on their shelves.  They can’t suggest you shop down the street for a product that’s better for you.  RIAs are fiduciaries, meaning they put their clients’ interests ahead of their own.  They focus on what’s best for the customer rather than the sale.

According to a survey by Cerulli Associates, over half of the ultra-high-net-worth clients still have their assets at wirehouses or bank trust departments.  That is changing as younger investors or the heirs of the older investors seek the kind of personal service that RIAs and Independent Wealth Managers provide.

If you’re looking for boutique service without paying more for it, contact us.

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Buy an Irish Castle for $7 million

It’s fun every once in a while to think about what it would be like if money was no object.  For today’s thought experiment we went to Ireland and found a storied castle for sale.

It’s Glin Castle, 700 years old, which was the ancestral home to the FitzGerald clan.  Think of it as Downton Abbey set in Ireland.  Located in west County Limerick, it sits on 380 acres, 23 of which are “pleasure grounds”—the woodland walks and gardens, both landscaped and informal, that surround the building. It’s been upgraded and operated for a time as a luxury bed-and-breakfast.  The furnishings are extra.  See HERE for more views.

... of <b>Glin</b>, who gave me a private tour of her residence, <b>Glin Castle</b>

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What the tortoise knows about financial security.

Remember the race between the tortoise and the hare? The tortoise won because he kept plugging along while the hare took a nap. Everyone would like to get rich quick; it’s the reason that people buy lottery tickets. But the chances of actually striking it rich are astronomical.

The way to get financially well-off is within the reach of almost anyone, even people who start out poor. What it takes is following a few simple rules.

  • Avoid destructive behavior.
  • Get an education and acquire a skill.
  • Spend less than you earn.
  • Start saving early.

The temptation to parlay a small bundle of cash into a fortune is what gets most people into trouble. Consistent saving over time is much more likely to pay off than strategies such as timing the market. Risk-the-farm investing strategies have a high probability of failure, but saving and prudent investing always wins.

Getting rich slowly is the primary way that most people achieve their financial dreams. The advantage of saving 10% or more of your income cannot be overemphasized. Do that and then let compounding go to work for you.

Compounding does a lot of the heavy lifting for investors. But it needs time to work. That means starting the process as early as possible and staying with it as long as possible. Waiting until you’re in your 40s or 50s means that you have given up twenty to thirty years of financial growth that you will never get back.

Want to have a million dollars by the time you’re 65? If you begin when you’re 25 with $25,000, save $3000 a year and invest the money to get a 7% return you’ll have $1 million when you’re 65. Of course as you get older and make more money you’ll be able to increase your savings rate, and end up with more than a million.

Finally, control your emotions or – better yet – hire an investment manager who will help control your emotions for you. Markets don’t go in one direction forever and that’s a good thing to keep in mind when the inevitable correction happens. An investment portfolio that lets you sleep well at night helps to cushion the blow of a decline and avoid the temptation to “bail out” at exactly the wrong time. In fact, investing more when the market’s “on sale” is a way to increase your wealth.

This is New Year‘s Eve; 2016 starts at midnight. It’s a great time to start if you have not done so already.

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Get the kind of advice that Fortune 500 Executives have.

I had an opportunity to attend an investment conference recently at which Alan Mulally spoke.   Mulally was the Chief Executive Officer of Boeing Aircraft before being recruited by William Ford to become President and CEO of Ford Motor.   He rescued Ford from the brink of bankruptcy; making it the only US car company to avoid a bailout by the government.

His talk was inspiring and revealing.   His management technique was simple: make a plan for the long term, review it regularly, and make changes when appropriate.

Top executives like Mulally are constantly solicited by top investment firms like Goldman Sachs who use their brand name prestige to impress their potential clients.   You know you’re rich when a Goldman salesman comes calling.

But Mulally didn’t go that way.   He chose an independent RIA (Registered Investment Advisor) to manage his family’s finances.   He used the same approach to managing his personal finances as he did to guiding the companies he led successfully.

He wanted his advisor to be someone who focused on him as an individual, not on simply his money. His advisor treats him like a friend, not a constant source of income. The service he gives goes beyond investments and includes retirement planning, estate planning and tax planning. His advisor is not selling a product; he’s offering Mulally financial peace.

Alan Mulally and his wife Jane have five children. All are adults now and out of the home. All five of them use the same advisor as their father.

You don’t have to be the Chief Executive Officer of a Fortune 500 company to get the kind of advisor that Alan Mulally and his family have. Its available right here from Korving & Company, an RIA with expertise that comes from decades of experience, who treats you like a friend, and offers you financial peace.

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