Tag Archives: Luxury Items

Buy a Paper Mill Heiress’s Greenwich Mansion for $5.5 Million

The seven-bedroom house sits on 10 acres.

 

Having recently inherited her mother’s house in the same community, Zelinsky is selling her old home for $5.495 million. The buyer of the 6,100-square-foot house (that measurement doesn’t include a partially finished basement) will benefit from Zelinsky’s family’s connection to the property and its surroundings.

 

Just in case you wanted to know what you could get if you had the money.  The grounds need some work.

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Living like the Earls of Downton Abbey

Want to live in grand country house in the English country side?

Some of these homes have been divided in apartments.  Here’s Apley Park.

 

 

Mr. Wentworth’s six-bedroom apartment, set over three south-facing floors, is one of 17 units on the property and located in the main building, called Library House.

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Independent Wealth Managers vs. Wirehouses

If you had the choice, would you rather shop at a boutique or a chain store?  You know what you get at a chain store: pre-packaged products on shelves that meet most of your needs but no personal service.  A boutique provides you with a lot more product selection, a high level of personal service and saves you time in meeting your needs.

The reason that so many people go to chain stores for groceries, hardware and clothing is that they usually offer lower prices. The interesting thing about the financial services industry is that the “chain stores” (the industry calls them “wirehouses”) like Merrill Lynch, UBS, Wells Fargo are not cheaper than financial boutiques.

These boutiques go by other names such as “Registered Investment Advisors” (RIAs) or “Independent Wealth Managers.”   But they are all focused on satisfying their customers, not on the sale.  They are true servants to their customers.  While wirehouses give the impression of size, the are limited to selling the products they have on their shelves.  They can’t suggest you shop down the street for a product that’s better for you.  RIAs are fiduciaries, meaning they put their clients’ interests ahead of their own.  They focus on what’s best for the customer rather than the sale.

According to a survey by Cerulli Associates, over half of the ultra-high-net-worth clients still have their assets at wirehouses or bank trust departments.  That is changing as younger investors or the heirs of the older investors seek the kind of personal service that RIAs and Independent Wealth Managers provide.

If you’re looking for boutique service without paying more for it, contact us.

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You and your Super-Yacht.

The OceAnco – Igor Lobanov Y708 85.60m Superyacht – Superyachts ...

Have you ever glanced at the pictures of the rich and famous having a party on the deck of a Super-Yacht somewhere in the Caribbean or Mediterranean?  Have you wondered what would it cost to party like that?  Well, it is expensive, but not impossible.  You see, they probably don’t own the yachts, they rent them.

In the April 15th issue of Private Wealth, they discuss what it takes.

Lounging in the Caribbean aboard a beautiful, 100-foot superyacht sounds pretty great, but it might be hard to relax when you’ve got a hefty engine repair bill to pay and crew payroll paperwork to review. The annual cost of operating a 180-foot vessel is $4.75 million, or about 10 percent of the yacht’s original cost. With high maintenance costs in mind, ultra-high-net-worth individuals looking to explore the high seas are increasingly turning to charters.…

A week on a superyacht can cost $115,500 to $190,000, on average, the report found, while the average purchase price is a bit more than $10 million …

Of course that puts it out of the price range of all except the ultra-high-net-worth individuals; those with a minimum worth of $30 million.

But the number of ultra-high-net worth people keeps growing and they often decide to rent a yacht or lease a jet rather than buying one.  It’s a business that keeps growing.

And for people who are climbing the financial ladder (or win the lottery), it doesn’t hurt to dream big.

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Buy an Irish Castle for $7 million

It’s fun every once in a while to think about what it would be like if money was no object.  For today’s thought experiment we went to Ireland and found a storied castle for sale.

It’s Glin Castle, 700 years old, which was the ancestral home to the FitzGerald clan.  Think of it as Downton Abbey set in Ireland.  Located in west County Limerick, it sits on 380 acres, 23 of which are “pleasure grounds”—the woodland walks and gardens, both landscaped and informal, that surround the building. It’s been upgraded and operated for a time as a luxury bed-and-breakfast.  The furnishings are extra.  See HERE for more views.

... of <b>Glin</b>, who gave me a private tour of her residence, <b>Glin Castle</b>

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8 Common Reasons for Retirement Failure

1. Overspending.

-You won’t spend less in retirement.  The old saw that retirees only spend 80% of their pre-retirement income is a myth.

2. Elder Fraud.

-Seniors are becoming the favored victims of swindlers.

3. Health care.

-As we age the cost of medical care goes up.  Medicare is covering less and premiums are going up.

4. Starting a business.

-Investing capital in a business that fails can devastate retirement finances.

5. Adult children.

-Helping your children through a “rough patch” can become is one of the most common ways of ending up broke.

6. Second homes.

-The cost of maintaining that vacation home when you’re no longer working can drain your resources when your income drops.

7. Divorce.

-Couples sometimes wait until the children leave home to divorce.  When assets are split 50/50, retirement becomes a problem for both parties.

8. Investment mistakes.

-Making poor investment choices is one of the most common ways of ruining your retirement lifestyle.

If you are nearing retirement, don’t enter into it without a plan.

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Top Luxury Cars For 2015

We’re always on the look-out for those little things that make out super-rich clients life better.  So with the start of 2015 in our rear-view mirror, and with the knowledge that the rich have gotten richer, Here’s an idea for a car that’s a mere $320,000.

Rolls-Royce Wraith, a 5,500-pound, 17-foot coupe whose nimble athleticism, silent interior and haute style beat all competitors in this range. Not that it really has any competitors: The Wraith has a V12, 624-horsepower twin-turbo engine, power-operated doors that swing out the opposite way of most cars, and a massive trunk. Beat that, if you can.

And no, we don’t know how many miles it gets per gallon.  If you have to ask, you can’t afford it.

 

 

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What Rich People Need to Know

I ran across an article at Market Watch titled “Ten things rich people know that you don’t.”  It listed the usual things:

  • Start saving early
  • Automate your savings
  • Maximize contributions to 401(k)s
  • Don’t carry credit card debt
  • Live below your means
  • Educate yourself about investing
  • Diversify
  • Hire a qualified financial advisor

All of that is something to take to heart when you’re young and just starting in life.  But what do people who are already rich need to know?

Lots of people get rich without following the rules.  They may start a successful business, enter a highly compensated profession, climb the corporate ladder, win the lottery, become a sports star or inherit a fortune.   Once you are rich, the number one objective for most people is to stay rich.  One very successful financial advisor with just 28 very wealthy clients said

“People don’t come to me to get rich, they come to me to stay rich.”

That’s the role of a good financial advisor.   Their job is to  do more than manage their client’s portfolios, it’s to take care that all of the other boxes are checked off:  to diversify the client portfolio, to educate the client about investing, to see to it that they live within their means.  In many cases they take care of family issues, lifestyle issues; the kinds of things that family offices do.

It’s what we do.  It’s what our clients expect.

Have a wealth maintenance question?   Contact us.

 

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The use and abuse of securities based lending

According to a recent article in Fortune magazine, the latest push by the big investment firms is to get as many of their clients as possible to borrow against the value of their portfolios.  Clients can borrow from 50% to 95% of their portfolio’s value.

Securities-based lending, also known as non-purpose lending, is Wall Street’s hottest business. From UBS to Bank of America Merrill Lynch to JPMorgan, high net worth investors are being enticed to take out loans against their brokerage accounts at a blistering pace. A May 2014 article in The Wall Street Journal told the story of Jason Katz, a UBS broker who has arranged portfolio loans for 21 of his clients in the prior year, a four-fold jump from the year before. The Journal reported that portfolio lending jumped by 28% at UBS between 2011 and 2013.

The loan has an interest rate, which may be either higher or lower than a bank loan.  But what many borrowers may not realize is that their portfolio can be sold out without their approval.

Supposed someone “has” to have $100,000 for a new boat.  With a stock portfolio worth $200,000, that individual can get a quick loan without a single transaction taking place.   But if the value of the portfolio drops, the firm has the right to sell the portfolio instantly, without notice.

Should market volatility result in a capital call, securities held directly by wealth management customers can be liquidated instantly with very little risk to the brokerages who’ve extended the credit. In essence, we’re seeing re-leveraging amongst the 10% of America that owns 80% of the stock market, while the other 90% of the country has been forced to deleverage in recent years.

As a fiduciary, it is our job to advise our clients on risks.  While taking an occasional short-term loan may be the right thing to do in special circumstances, borrowing against a portfolio, especially near the limits is very, very dangerous.  Wall Street is pushing these loans to fatten it’s bottom line.  Don’t get hooked.

 

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What Sports Stars and Lottery Winners Have In Common

According to a story in Yahoo Finance:

Former NBA player, Antoine Walker, 38, earned over $110 million throughout his NBA career, more than four times the average player in the league. All that money, though, didn’t stop this All-Star from going broke.

Walker’s financial problems began his first year in the league as a 19-year-old rookie with the Boston Celtics in 1996. Although he had a financial advisor help him establish a plan for his long-term finances, Walker had other ideas about what he wanted to do with his newfound wealth.

“Through my young arrogance, being ignorant to a degree and being stubborn and wanting to do my own thing with my money, I went against a lot of his wishes,” Walker told Yahoo Finance.

The rest of the story is predictable. Walker spent lavishly on his relatives, buying them multi-million dollar houses and expensive luxury cars. He spent lots of money on himself and got himself a “posse”

His generosity extended beyond his family to his many friends and acquaintances. From lavish all-expenses-paid trips to luxury gifts for his friends, Walker made sure everyone in his circle enjoyed the lifestyle he led. With his fellow NBA players, Walker gambled extensively – losing $646,900 in just two years.

He then made things worse by going into debt, “investing” in real estate. For a financial rookie he poured money into things he didn’t understand, undoubtedly persuaded by sales people who saw a naïve man with lots of money.

…Walker had a plan to put his income to work and bought more than 140 properties along the South Side of Chicago. Whether it was land to build on or commercial and income properties, Walker had a full-range of real estate investments meant to maintain the lifestyle he had built for his family after retiring from the league.
With the housing bubble and bust, Walker found himself defaulting on loans where he was the personal guarantor, losing value on land, and failed to get a handle on the legal issues that followed.

He finally declared bankruptcy, with liabilities exceeding assets by over $8 million.

This is almost exactly the same path that most lottery winners walk. Unaccustomed to their sudden wealth, they buy things for themselves, their families, their friends and anyone who has a hard-luck story. If they are especially unlucky, they get sold “investments” like real estate that they don’t understand, on credit. That is a recipe for disaster. They imagine that the pot of gold they found is unlimited. It isn’t.

They may find a financial advisor. A good financial advisor will tell them “no.” But people who come into sudden wealth rarely take no for an answer. So they ignore the financial advisor. It really doesn’t take that long to run through millions of dollars.

So what’s the lottery winner or the next highly paid sports star to do? The first thing is to realize that there is no such thing as unlimited wealth. The second thing is to learn to say “no” and get a good financial advisor who will say that for you.

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