Tag Archives: estate planning

Before I Go

 

We were asked to speak to a group of retirees at a retirement home recently.  We took as our subject our book: Before I Go.

We wrote it based on the experience we had over three decades helping people deal with the aftermath of a death in the family.  Most often is was the death of a spouse.

When the deceased was the one who managed the family assets and paid the bills, we found that all too often the surviving spouse was at a loss.  Suddenly she was alone, and often had little or no guidance about the financial affairs for which she was now responsible.

Before I Go is a guide and a workbook for couples; a list of things that the other should know in anticipation that one of them will be left alone.

For a copy of the book and workbook, go HERE.  Sharing it with your spouse will be a labor or love.

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Being There

Anyone who has been in a long-term committed relationship understands what “being there” means.

One of the benefits of a stable relationship is that you have someone you can rely in when you need help.  Couples support each other.  Even as traditional roles have evolved, most families still have a division of labor when it comes to certain chores and tasks.  The fact is that some people are good at one thing and not so good at others.  What’s great about compatible couples is that they complement each other and, as a result, they are stronger, smarter and wiser together.

This is why the loss of a companion is such a traumatic experience.

All of a sudden, the person you have relied on is no longer there.  There is a big void in your life.  You may find yourself wondering what you are going to do.

While we don’t promote ourselves as the substitute spouse, in a financial sense we quite often find ourselves in that role.

When a spouse or long-time companion dies, our surviving clients often call on us to provide financial guidance.  Having dealt with hundreds of these transitions, we know the ins and outs of the estate settlement process.  We know the common pitfalls and things that can go wrong and are there to provide advice and guidance to help lift the burden and take care of things correctly and efficiently.

We relieve people from having to do it themselves.

We’ve written a set of books on this issue to help people plan ahead before their time comes, called BEFORE I GO.  The book and workbook are a wonderful compliment to traditional estate planning documents and help to fill in the missing information that those documents tend to leave out.

For a copy of these guides, you can contact us or you can buy them on Amazon.com.  Click HERE for a link.

Let us know if you have any questions or if you or anyone you’re close to needs an experienced and helpful hand working through one of these situations.

 

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Where Should I Keep My Estate Planning Documents?

The Hook Law Firm has a good article on where you should keep your estate planning documents.  Read the whole thing.

They make a number of good points.

  • Make sure that you have original copy of your will.  Copies may not be accepted for probate.
  • Make sure someone knows where your important documents are.
  • Make sure that people you trust to use the documents can get to them.
  • Destroy old or out-of-date documents to avoid confusion.

We offer a set of books: Before I Go and Before I Go Workbook to guide people through the process of preparing their estate for their heirs.  You can order a copy at Amazon.com or get an autographed set directly from us for $25.  Just send us a check made out to Korving & Company, 1510 Breezeport Way, Suite 800, Suffolk, VA 23435.

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What to do if you win the lottery

Lottery winners so often end up broke that it’s become a common story. If you want to break the curse of the lottery winner here are a few simple things you can do.

1. Lottery winners usually go on a spending binge because they now have more money that they ever imagined. This leads them to believe their new-found wealth is endless. It’s not. Kings, potentates, even countries (see Greece) have gone broke; even billionaires can run out of money. The financial object of a lottery winner should be to insure that then never end up broke, even if they live a long time. There are ways of insuring that you won’t run out of money. The first thing you need to do after receiving that check is to get a good, honest financial advisor.

2. Lottery winners attract people like bees to honey. These can be relatives, friends, strangers who heard about the winner’s good fortune. They want gifts (and you want to give them), they expect you to pick up the check. The most dangerous are the people who come to you with “deals” that will make you even richer. One of the best ways to handle this is to refer everyone to your financial advisor; explain that he’s the person who’s handling your finances. That way you are not the one turning anyone away.

3. Lottery winners have tax issues that they never had before. Before accepting that check, it’s a good idea to organize a small team – quarterbacked by your financial advisor – that includes a including a CPA and an attorney.

Buying a lottery ticket is not a wise investment. If you beat astronomical odds and win, you are the same person you were before even though people will suddenly find you incredibly witty, smart and good looking. But if you must buy a ticket – and win – keep these ideas in mind.

 

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Financial Planning in the Shadow of Dementia

Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, is an epidemic. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. It’s irreversible and fatal although some may linger for up to 20 years. And the number is expected to soar.

The Alzheimer’s Association has created a list of the 10 warning signs. These range from memory loss, through confusion to severe mood changes.

Because of the widespread nature of this disease, for people with Alzheimer’s and their families there are a number of things that should be done. Plans should be in place well before the onset of the symptoms.

• Review your insurance policies, especially your Long Term Care policies.
• Talk with your family and your financial advisor to make your wishes known.
• Review your wills and trusts.
• Appoint an advocate who has the legal authority to act on your behalf.
• Make sure you have provided for an appropriate Power of Attorney.

Research shows that declining financial skills is one of the first symptoms of the early stages of Alzheimer’s. This includes anything from difficulty in balancing a checkbook to being victimized by criminals who prey on the elderly. This usually leaves family members to take responsibility for the individual’s finances.

In some cases, people assume these responsibilities without having experience handling money or dealing with financial issues. This is the time to bring in a trusted financial advisor. We can provide practical guidance on both day-to-day and long-term financial decisions.

For a report on this subject, contact Korving & Company – the Financial Planning and Investment Management experts.

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“What Is the CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Certification?”

No doubt you’re well aware of the volatility that has characterized the economic environment over the past five years. It’s little wonder that personal financial security is still uppermost in many peoples’ minds. They’re eager for advice about their retirement, estate plans, insurance, emergency funds, liabilities and their asset allocation. Today’s financial conditions require a holistic approach – looking at an individual’s entire financial picture, not just one aspect or another. Working with a Certified Financial Planner™ professional is assurance that he or she is a credentialed expert who is held to high ethical and professional standards.

So I’m taking this moment to remind you that I’ve been a CFP® professional for 21 years. The designation comes with extensive training in financial planning, estate planning, insurance, investments, taxes, employee benefits and retirement planning, as well as in CFP Board’s Standards of Professional Conduct, which are rigorously enforced. As a CFP® professional, I’m required to uphold my certification through continuing education – something to consider with new financial instruments appearing regularly on the consumer market. In fact, CFP® certification is the most recognized in the industry for personal financial planning. So as you think about your financial future, please bear in mind that only 17% of all financial advisors in the industry can claim this distinction.

Please ask for the CFP® brochure. E-mail us at info@korvingco.com Visit our website to learn about us. If you have any questions or would like an analysis of your current financial situation, I’d love to hear from you.

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