Tag Archives: Dementia

The financial risks of dementia

dementia-symptoms-and-brain changes

Dementia covers a broad range of mental diseases that cause a gradual decrease in the ability to think and remember.  It often affects a person’s daily functioning and is different from the decline in cognitive abilities that are the usual effects of aging.  The most common type of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease.

About one in ten people get dementia.  It becomes more common with age and it’s estimated that about half of those over age 85 suffer from it in some degree.

As the disease progresses, most people with dementia require a certain amount of skilled care.  Eventually the family will not be able to provide the 24 hour services that the patient requires and they will be placed in a facility designed to provide that care.

According to the NY Times:

On average, the out-of-pocket cost for a patient with dementia was $61,522 — more than 80 percent higher than the cost for someone with heart disease or cancer. The reason is that dementia patients need caregivers to watch them, help with basic activities like eating, dressing and bathing, and provide constant supervision to make sure they do not wander off or harm themselves. None of those costs were covered by Medicare.

For many families, the cost of caring for a dementia patient often “consumed almost their entire household wealth,” said Dr. Amy S. Kelley, a geriatrician at Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai in New York and the lead author of a paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

As people age their cognitive abilities deteriorate.  Even before they begin to suffer the effects of dementia, they may become forgetful or lose the ability to focus on their finances.  Obtaining the services of a Registered Investment Advisor (RIA) well before this happens – a fiduciary that puts his clients’ interests first – is vital.  And, as people prepare retirement plans, the cost of dementia treatment and care should be one of the things for which they plan.

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Financial Planning in the Shadow of Dementia

Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, is an epidemic. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. It’s irreversible and fatal although some may linger for up to 20 years. And the number is expected to soar.

The Alzheimer’s Association has created a list of the 10 warning signs. These range from memory loss, through confusion to severe mood changes.

Because of the widespread nature of this disease, for people with Alzheimer’s and their families there are a number of things that should be done. Plans should be in place well before the onset of the symptoms.

• Review your insurance policies, especially your Long Term Care policies.
• Talk with your family and your financial advisor to make your wishes known.
• Review your wills and trusts.
• Appoint an advocate who has the legal authority to act on your behalf.
• Make sure you have provided for an appropriate Power of Attorney.

Research shows that declining financial skills is one of the first symptoms of the early stages of Alzheimer’s. This includes anything from difficulty in balancing a checkbook to being victimized by criminals who prey on the elderly. This usually leaves family members to take responsibility for the individual’s finances.

In some cases, people assume these responsibilities without having experience handling money or dealing with financial issues. This is the time to bring in a trusted financial advisor. We can provide practical guidance on both day-to-day and long-term financial decisions.

For a report on this subject, contact Korving & Company – the Financial Planning and Investment Management experts.

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