Tag Archives: Before I Go

Where Should I Keep My Estate Planning Documents?

The Hook Law Firm has a good article on where you should keep your estate planning documents.  Read the whole thing.

They make a number of good points.

  • Make sure that you have original copy of your will.  Copies may not be accepted for probate.
  • Make sure someone knows where your important documents are.
  • Make sure that people you trust to use the documents can get to them.
  • Destroy old or out-of-date documents to avoid confusion.

We offer a set of books: Before I Go and Before I Go Workbook to guide people through the process of preparing their estate for their heirs.  You can order a copy at Amazon.com or get an autographed set directly from us for $25.  Just send us a check made out to Korving & Company, 1510 Breezeport Way, Suite 800, Suffolk, VA 23435.

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Korving & Company – Suffolk Small Business of the Year

We are very proud that Korving & Company has been named Suffolk Small Business of the Year by the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce (HRCC).

HRCC Suffolk SBOY award 2015

We were honored at a luncheon on Norfolk sponsored by the HRCC on June 12th. Pictures of the event can be found on our Facebook page.

Here is what Inside Business had to say about us:

Father-and-son duo Arie and Stephen Korving have more than four decades of experience in financial advising between the two of them.

Arie Korving entered the business in 1986, working for a global wealth management firm, and Stephen joined him at the firm in 2004, after working in institutional money management. Branching out to start Korving & Co. in 2010 gave them the opportunity to provide individualized financial advice to clients. Their purpose is managing money but putting people first is at the core of what they do.

“We know our clients,” Stephen said. “We manage money for them to help them achieve what it is they want.”
Today, they have clients in every stage and circumstance of life, from the widow in an assisted living facility to the corporate executive. The common denominator among clients is that they remain with Korving & Co. for a long time, some for over 20 years.

Because of Arie’s establishment in the industry and his ability to maintain relationships, they are not just nationwide but across countries, Stephen said. Given the nature of how they invest, long distance relationships with clients have never been an impediment.

“We are a family business that works with families,” Stephen said. “We do for our clients what we would do for our family members if they were in the clients’ situation.”

“We decided to run this business to help people achieve their goals and we want to do it in a highly ethical, highly transparent way,” Arie added.

It is this type of personalized guidance that has kept the company increasing at 15 percent to 20 percent per year, a rate that they want to continue to see as long as it provides the opportunity to work with people in a meaningful and impactful way.

This principle was further established during the market crashes of 2000 and 2008, after which the company decided to become totally independent of large investment firms, allowing them to provide service based on their clients’ needs.

“It really resonates with people when you can say let’s find what you really want to do rather than what the market wants to do,” Arie said. “That type of risk control is an important service we offer.”

Located in Suffolk, they are truly a small business by choice with only one other employee beside themselves on payroll. By staying small, they are able to grow in relationships and be involved in the community, Stephen said.
Arie recently published a book, “Before I Go,” which shares his life experiences from an educational standpoint. They also have had articles in local publications and are currently rated No. 4 in financial blogging in Virginia and in the top 100 in the U.S….

Their bottom line is helping people. “We can continue to grow in the amount of money we manage, but we want to maintain the very personal relationships we have with people,” Arie said.
“People never want to think of themselves as a number.”

We welcome your inquiries.

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How to connect with your spouse about finances

Too many spouses don’t share enough information about family finances. It’s not unusual for one spouse to take care of investments and pay the bills. The other spouse may not be interested or may be too busy. It’s a fact that not everyone is interested in investing, budgeting or banking.

But this can lead to a bad outcome in case of death, divorce or separation. In fact, money is one of the top 10 reasons for marriage breakdown.

Money or anything related to finances can be a possible cause of disagreement between many people – including couples. Married couples, whether they are happy or not, may have disagreements over little financial issues to much bigger shared financial responsibilities or unequal monetary status. Money may not always be the principal cause but in fact is usually combined with other forms of reasons for divorce. In any case, it is still a significant contributor and should be managed with fairness from both sides, mutual understanding and a tiny dose of compromise.

But even couples that are financially compatible should sit down from time to time to review their financial situation. Our books: BEFORE I GO and BEFORE I GO WORKBOOK were written to help people do this.

If there is a difference in the financial mind-sets of a couple, a financial advisor may be able to act as a facilitator to reconcile the differences.

A financial advisor can educate the couple about investing, budgeting and retirement planning. Regular meetings with a couple’s financial advisor provide them with the opportunity to share critical family financial issues, keep everyone informed and help resolve issues before they lead to conflict.

Having a trusted financial advisor in place, one who is already familiar with a couple’s finances, can also help in case you find yourself “suddenly single.”

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Survivors’ Income

We are frequently asked to help people whose spouses have died to help settle the estate and plan for life as widows or widowers.  One of the big questions that they face is determining what it costs to live as a single instead of a couple and where the income is going to come from.

We wrote a book specifically designed to help answer those questions.

Below is from page 53 of BEFORE I GO – WORKBOOK

Keep in mind that it’s a lot easier to determine the answer to many of these questions ahead of time, while both husband and wife are still living, and access to information about survivors’ pension benefits, social security income and annuity income are easy to determine.

For a copy of BEFORE I GO and BEFORE I GO – WORKBOOK contact us or order it from Amazon.com

My Survivors’ Income:

“GUARANTEED” INCOME
Social Security:         $__________________
Pension income #1: $__________________ Source:_____________________
Pension income #2: $__________________ Source:_____________________
Pension income #3: $__________________ Source:_____________________
Annuity #1:                $__________________ Source:_____________________
Annuity #2:               $__________________ Source:_____________________
Other Guaranteed:   $__________________ Source:_____________________
SUBTOTAL GUARANTEED: $__________________

PORTFOLIO INCOME:
Interest Income:       $__________________ Source:_____________________
Dividend Income:    $__________________ Source:_____________________
Rental Income:         $__________________ Source:_____________________
Business Income:     $__________________ Source:_____________________
Other:                         $__________________ Source:_____________________
Other:                         $__________________ Source:_____________________
SUBTOTAL PORTFOLIO: $__________________
GRAND TOTAL:                   $__________________

 

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Estate taxes and you.

Have you reviewed your estate plans recently? If not, you may want to do so now. The reason is that there have been some big changes in the amount of money you can leave to your heirs free of estate taxes.

For the 2014 tax year, the estate tax exclusion amount is $5.34 million. It increases to $5.43 million for 2015.

That’s good news, right?  Maybe not.

There may be a problem if your estate plan was drafted in 2001 when the exemption was $675,000. Since then, the exemption has fluctuated wildly from 2001 though 2011. During this time, many people had wills and trusts drafted that would double the exemption by creating “family” trusts.

It’s possible that the formula for determining how much of the couple’s assets will go to the “family” trust will now cause all of the assets go into the trust rather than to the surviving spouse. This may not be the result that most people want.

For added information about estate planning, get a copy of our book “Before I Go” and the accompanying workbook.

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The “Thundering Herd” is shrinking

The “wirehouses” (the industry term for major investment firms like Merrill Lynch known as the “Thundering Herd”) are continuing to lose brokers. There has been a 12% decline in headcount since 2008 according to Cerulli Associates in 2014 the trend continued.

What does this mean for investors at these firms? First, quite a few have lost the advisors they were working with. Clients who stayed with these firms were assigned another advisor. Others may have moved to independent firms if their brokers stayed in the business.

The bottom line is that the wirehouses have struggled to regain their financial footing after the crash of 2008. They did this by reducing headcount, by increasing fees, and by encouraging their brokers to sell more aggressively.

They have also focused on the ultra-high net worth clients and actively discouraged their broker/”advisors” from dealing with investors with less than a quarter-million dollar accounts. This, of course, provides an opportunity for the independent RIA (Registered Investment Advisor) community.

So while the Thundering Herd has been shrinking, the RIA community has been growing. And according to Cerulli they are even getting a growing share of the high net worth clientele.

To find our more about us, call, write or leave a message and get a copy of our book Before I Go.

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Finding financial guidance for the middle aged executive

Let’s imagine that you’re now firmly on your career track. You’re an expert in your field and have a team of experts to manage some of the complexities of life outside of work.

  • You doctor gives you regular medical check-ups.
  • Your attorney to reviews your estate plans regularly.
  • Your CPA prepares your taxes and suggests ways to reduce them.
  • But there’s something missing ….

You are putting away some serious money and you are getting nervous about market risk so you want to find a good financial advisor. You don’t want a broker who will call you to sell stocks and bonds on commission. You want someone who will create a plan and give you unbiased financial advice. Someone who will manage your portfolio for you – commission free – so that your retirement plans won’t blow up just as you get ready to enjoy independence.

But there’s a dilemma. Just as you feel more comfortable knowing that the pilot on your next flight has spent thousands of hours flying your plane, you want to find a seasoned financial pro who has experience in all kinds of markets. But those years of experience could well mean that he’ll retire before you do! What’s the solution?

Recognizing that continuity is important in a relationship as personal as financial guidance, many advisors have set up teams.

Korving & Company is a good example. Arie Korving has nearly 30 years of experience as a financial advisor. A Certified Financial Planner, he is the author of numerous articles and books on finance and estate planning, he has experience that includes both Bull and Bear markets. He’s seen the investment world from both sides and knows that honesty and experience is what people want in their advisor.

Stephen Korving received his degree in finance from Virginia Tech with a focus on risk management. After graduation he joined Cambridge Associates, one of the country’s leading investment management consulting firms. Cambridge provides guidance to major institutions and the super-rich. A Certified Financial Planner, he teamed up with Arie ten years ago and in 2010 they founded Korving & Company, a boutique RIA (Registered Investment Advisor) focused on providing holistic financial guidance to executives and retirees.

Together they provide decades of experience and a plan to continue to do so for decades into the future.  Check them out.

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Living well in retirement

No one plans to live in poverty in retirement. But one of the biggest problems for the majority of current workers is that they don’t plan … period. So what can we do to live better in retirement?

  •  Save, save, save and start early. The biggest tool that anyone has is time. Time is the magic that makes compound interest a miracle.  There is no substitute for starting early, and that means as soon as you leave school and begin work. Those who begin saving in their 20s saving $50 a month will end up with more money that those who started in their 40s.
  • Don’t retire early. People are living longer than ever before. Unless you are already rich, retiring early has at least three pernicious effects. First, your income stops and you begin drawing down your savings. Second, your pension and social security payments are much lower than if you wait. Third, you will spend more time as a retiree, forcing you to reduce spending to stretch your savings dollars.
  • After you retire from your main job and if you are physically able, find a paying job that will supplement your other income sources.
  • Find a way to cut costs. One of the best ways to reduce the cost of living during retirement is to be out of debt and that includes mortgage debt. It also pays, once you are empty nesters, to downsize the home. This has the effect of reducing taxes, utility and maintenance costs.

And once you are retired, get a copy of my book, Before I Go, so that you will be ready for the next stage on your journey.

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If you were widowed, would you fire your husband’s financial advisor?

According to an article in Financial Advisor magazine,

Surviving spouses — statistically, wives — have a habit of firing financial advisors. Most sources peg the rate at about 50%, but the advisor-education website says the rate is closer to 70% if you wait a few years for the penny to drop.

Why is that?  It seems that most advisors have an “unbalanced advisor-client relationship.”  That means the advisor focuses on the half of the couple that seems to be more financially savvy.  This results in the surviving spouse, often the wife, not really thinking that the advisor is “her” advisor.

The article goes on to suggest that the advisor “provide basic, nuts-and-bolts financial advice to the surviving spouse.”

At Korving & Co. we go one better.  We have written a set of books “Before I Go” and the “Before I Go Workbook” anticipating the issues that the surviving spouse will face.

That’s why when our clients lose a spouse, we rarely lose the survivor.  They know that we focus on the family and the surviving widow trust us to take care of her.  In fact, we often find that when both husband and wife have passed on, the children come to us to manage their affairs.

For a personally autographed copy of both books, or more information on how we can help you, contact us.

 

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It’s about making people’s lives better

It’s not just about money.

In most people’s minds the term “financial advisor” has all the emphasis on “financial” and very little about “advisor.” We disagree. We think of ourselves as advisors to the family, helping guide families with a whole range of issues. Some don’t have anything to do with investing.

We have gone car shopping for a client who didn’t want to deal with car salesmen. We have helped people choose the right retirement community.  We help educate young people about investing to make sure they get a good start in life.  We explore vacation destinations for our clients. We review our clients’ estate plans and beneficiary designations to make sure that they are in line with their wishes. We wrote a book designed to help people provide critical information to their heirs before they pass on (Before I Go).

And, of course, we have provided peace of mind to clients who worried about running out of money in their retirement years. This allowed them to do the things they wanted such as travel, spend time with their grandchildren or just relax with a good book.

We do more than manage portfolios. We assist the people who come to us for advice with the deeply personal things in their lives. Making people’s lives better is our goal.

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