Tag Archives: 401(k)

What happens if you are 70 ½ and you have an IRA and a 403(b)?

RMDs, or Required Minimum Distributions have to be taken after you become 70 ½ if you have a retirement account such as an IRA or 401(k).   To determine the amount you are required to take, the value of all of your retirement accounts have to be added together.  If you have multiple retirement accounts you can take the RMD from only one account and leave the others alone … unless you have a 403(b) plan.

403(b) plan accounts must be added to the total of the retirement accounts to determine the RMD.  But  you can’t use distributions from IRAs to satisfy the RMDs from 403(b)s, nor can you use 403(b) distributions to satisfy IRA RMDs.

However, if you have several different 403(b) accounts, you can take the RMD from just one of the accounts, as long as it’s at least as much as the RMD based on the sum of all of the 403(b) accounts.

If you are retired, you may be able to simplify your life by rolling all of your retirement accounts into an IRA.  That way you can eliminate a lot of confusion, and the potential penalties that go along with making a mistake.

If you have questions about retirement accounts, call us.

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The Retirement Challenge

For most people, retiring means the end of a paycheck, but not the end of an active life.  The typical retiree spends 20 to 30 years in retirement and running out of money is their biggest fear.  When you retire, how will your lifestyle be affected?  Here are some of the things to take into consideration.

Retirement age – Modern retirees face lots of choices that their parents did not have.  There is no longer a mandatory retirement age, so the question “when should I retire” gets more complicated.

Social Security – The age at which you apply for Social Security benefits has a big effect on your retirement income.  Apply early and you reduce your monthly benefits by 25% – 30%, depending on your age.  Wait until you’re 70 and you increase your monthly benefit by up to 32% (8% per year), depending on your age.  If you are married, the decisions get even more complicated.

Pension – If you are entitled to a pension, the amounts you receive usually depend on your length of service.  The formula used to calculate the pension benefit can get quite complicated.  Those who work for employers whose finances are questionable may want to consider whether they will get the benefits they are promised.  If you are married, you will need to decide how much of your pension will go to your spouse if you die first.

Second career – More and more people go back to work after retirement.  Many don’t want to stop working, but do something different.  Others use their skills to become consultants, or turn a hobby into a business.  A second career makes a big difference in your retirement lifestyle and how much income you will have in retirement.

Investment accounts – These are the funds you have saved for retirement: in IRAs, 401(k)s, 403(b)s, 457s, and individual accounts.  These funds are under your control.  Most retirees use them to supplement Social Security and pension income.  They are the key to determining how well people live in retirement.

Combine these issue with the effects of inflation, market volatility, investment returns and health care costs and it becomes apparent that retirees need to plan.  If your retirement is years away, a plan allows you to make mid-course corrections.  If you’re already retired a plan will allow you to sleep soundly, knowing that a lot of the uncertainty has been removed.

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What’s the Difference Between an IRA and a Roth IRA

A questioner on Investopedia.com asks:

I contribute about 10% to my 401k. I want to know more about Roth IRAs. I have one with my company, but haven’t contributed any percentage yet as I am not sure how much I should contribute. What exactly is a Roth IRA? Additionally, what is the ideal contribution to a 401k for someone making $48K a year?

Here was my reply:

A Roth IRA is a retirement account.  It differs from a regular IRA in two important aspects.  First the negative: you do not get a tax deduction for contributing to a Roth IRA.  But there is a big positive: you do not have to pay taxes on money you take out during retirement.  And, like a regular IRA, your money grows sheltered from taxes.  There’s also another bonus to Roth IRAs: unlike regular IRAs, there are no rules requiring you to take annual required minimum distributions (RMDs) from your Roth IRA, even after you reach age 70 1/2.

In general, the tax benefits of being able to get money out of a Roth IRA outweigh the advantages of the immediate tax deduction you get from making a contribution to a regular IRA.  The younger you are and the lower your tax bracket, the bigger the benefit of a Roth IRA.

There is no “ideal” contribution to a 401k plan unless there is a company match.  You should always take full advantage of a company match because it is  essentially “free money” that the company gives you.

Have a question for us?  Ask away:

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Will Retiring Force Cutbacks in Your Lifestyle?

For most people, retiring means the end of a paycheck.  When you retire, how will your lifestyle be affected?  If you don’t know the answer to that, shouldn’t you find out before it’s too late?  There are so many things to take into consideration.

Retirement age – Modern retirees face lots of choices that their parents did not have.  There is no longer a mandatory retirement age, so the question “when should I retire” gets more complicated.

Social Security – The age at which you apply for Social Security benefits has a big effect on your retirement income.  Apply early and you reduce your monthly benefits by 25% – 30%, depending on your age.  Wait until you’re 70 and you increase your monthly benefit by up to 32% (8% per year), depending on your age.  If you are married, the decisions get even more complicated.

Pension – If you are entitled to a pension, the amounts you receive usually depend on your length of service.  The formula used to calculate the pension benefit can get quite complicated.  Those who work for employers whose finances are questionable may want to consider whether they will get the benefits they are promised.  If you are married, you will need to decide how much of your pension will go to your spouse if you die first.

Second career – More and more people go back to work after retirement.  Quite a few people don’t want to stop working, but do something different.  Others use their skills to become consultants, or turn a hobby into a business.  A second career makes a big difference in your retirement lifestyle and how much income you will have in retirement.

Investment accounts – These are the funds you have saved for retirement: in IRAs, 401(k)s, 403(b)s, 457s, and individual accounts.  These funds are under your control.  Most retirees use them to supplement Social Security and pension income.  They are the key to determining how well people live in retirement.

To find out whether you will be forced to cut back after you retire, you need a plan that allows you to take all these factors into consideration.  A plan allows you to make mid-course corrections before it’s too late.

If you have questions, contact us.

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The Trouble with 401(k) Plans

assets.sourcemedia.com

The 401(k) plan is now the primary retirement plan for employees in the private sector and Ted Benna isn’t happy.  Benna is regarded as the “father” of the 401(k) plan but now he calls his child a “monster.”

There are several problems modern with 401(k) type plans.

  1. They are too complicated. The typical 401(k) plan has dozens of investment options. These are often included to satisfy government regulatory demands for broad diversification.  For the plan sponsor, who has a fiduciary responsibility, more is better.  However, for the typical worker, this just creates confusion.  He or she is not an expert in portfolio construction.  Investment choices are often made when an employee gets a new job and there are other things that are more pressing than creating the perfect portfolio.  Which leads to the second problem.
  1. Employees are given too little information. Along with a list of funds available to the employee, the primary information provided is the past performance of the funds in the plan.  However, we are constantly reminded that past performance is no guarantee of future results.  But if past performance is the main thing that the employee goes by, he or she will often invest in high-flying funds that are likely to expose them to the highest risk, setting them up for losses when the market turns.
  1. There are no in-house financial experts available to employees. Employee benefits departments are not equipped to provide guidance to their employees; that’s not their function.  In fact, they are discouraged from providing any information beyond the list of investment options and on-line links to mutual fund prospectuses.  Doing more exposes the company to liability if the employee becomes unhappy.

What’s the answer?  Until there are major revisions to 401(k) plans, it’s up to the employee to get help.  One answer is to meet with a financial advisor – an RIA – who is able and willing to accept the responsibility of providing advice and creating an appropriate portfolio using the options available in the plan.  There will probably be a fee associated with this advice, but the result should be a portfolio that reflects the employee’s financial goals and risk tolerance.

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Planning to Retire Someday? Start Planning Today!

Americans want help with financial planning.

A recent survey showed that most Americans don’t want to do their own financial planning but they don’t know where to go for help.  60% of adults say that managing their finances is a chore and many of them lack the skills or time to do a proper job.

The need for financial planning has never been greater.  For most of history, retirement was a dream that few lived long enough to achieve.  In a society where most people lived on farms, people relied on family for support.  Financial planning meant having enough children so that when you could no longer work, if you were fortunate enough to reach old age,  you could live with them.

The industrial revolution took people away from the farm and into cities.  Life expectancy increased.  In the beginning of the 20th century life expectancy at birth was about 48 years.  Government and industry began offering pensions to their employees.  Social Security, which was signed into law in 1935, was not designed to provide a full post-retirement income but to increase income for those over 65.

For decades afterward, retirement planning for many Americans meant getting a lifetime job with a company so that you could retire with a pension.  The responsibility to adequately fund the pension fell on the employer.  Over time, as more benefits were added, many companies incurred pension and retirement benefit obligations that became unsustainable.  General Motors went bankrupt partially because of the amount of money it owed to retired workers via pension and health obligations.

As a result, companies are abandoning traditional pension plans (known as “defined benefit plans”) in favor of 401(k) plans (known as “defined contribution plans.”) This shifts the burden of post-retirement income from the employer to the worker.   Instead of knowing what your pension income will be, employees are responsible for investing their money wisely so that they will have enough saved to allow them to retire.

In years past, people who invested some of their money in stocks, bonds and mutual funds viewed this as extra savings for their retirement years.  With the end of defined benefit pension plans, investing for retirement has become much more serious.  The kind of lifestyle people will have in retirement depends entirely on how well they manage their 401(k) plans, their IRAs and other investments.

Fortunately, the people who are beginning their careers are recognizing that there will probably not be pensions for them when they retire.  Even public employees like teachers, municipal and state employees are going to get squeezed.  Stockton, California declared bankruptcy over it’s pension obligations.  The State of Illinois’ pension obligations are only 24% funded.  Other states are facing a similar problem.

In fact, many Millennials we talk to question whether Social Security will even be there for them.  They also realize that they need help planning.  Traditional brokerage firms provide some guidance, but the average stock broker may not have the training, skills or tools to create a financial plan.  Mutual fund organizations can offer some guidance but getting personal financial guidance via a 800 number is not the kind of inpersonal relationship that most people want.

But there is an answer.  The rapidly growing independent RIA (Registered Investment Advisor) industry offers the kind of personal guidance that people want to help them create and execute a successful financial plan that will take them from work through retirement.  Many RIAs are also Certified Financial Planners (CFP™).  Many are fiduciaries who put their clients’ interests ahead of their own.  Dealing with a local RIA is like dealing with a family friend who’s can act as your personal financial guide.

For more information, and a copy of our book Before I Go, contact us.

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Major Investment Firm Finds Most 401(k) Participants Stressed About Finances

An overwhelming majority of Americans in 401(k) plans are feeling increasingly insecure about their financial future, and most said they could use some professional financial help …

Employees of both large and small companies are feeling increasingly insecure about their financial futures.  A large part of this is based on the decline of pension plans which were once offered as benefits by large employers.  Most companies now offer 401 (k) plans which leave the responsibility for retirement income up to employees.

As a result, over half of those surveyed wanted help managing their finances.  While some employers offer “financial wellness” programs, many employees would rather not use them because of privacy concerns.  This is where the RIA (Registered Investment Advisor) provides exceptional value.

A lot of this stress can be relieved by getting a financial plan.  The RIA industry offers financial planning to people who wonder when or if they will ever be able to retire.  These firms also offer to manage their clients’ money for them, relieving the anxiety of people who are concerned about how their money should best be invested.

Getting regular reports and performance reviews, being able to talk to someone about concerns, and dealing with people who are fiduciaries relieves a lot of stress.

To relieve your stress, give us a call.

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The Fiduciary Rule and You

The Department of Labor (DOL) has issued its final version of the fiduciary rule regarding retirement accounts.  The issue that the DOL is trying to address is that broker-dealers (major investment firms like MLPFS, UBS, etc.) do not have to act in their clients’ best interest.  They only have make recommendations that are “suitable.”  What that means is that if a broker-dealer representative has the choice between recommending two investments, they can recommend the one that pays them more, as long as the recommendation is suitable. That may not be in the client’s best interest.

The “fiduciary” standard requires an investment advisor to recommend the investment that is in the best interest of the client.  That often results in lower costs to clients.  Korving & Company is a pure RIA (Registered Investment Advisor) and is a fiduciary.   We do not offer commission-based products and offer our clients the lowest cost versions of appropriate investments.

The DOL rules apply to retirement accounts like 401(k) and IRAs.

For questions about the fiduciary rule, contact us.

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Retirement Plan Contribution Limits for 2016

One of the most common questions we get from clients throughout the year has to do with retirement plan contribution limits.  We put together this quick-reference chart, which shows the limits for most people:

2016 IRS Retirement Plan Contribution Limits

Not much has changed from 2015, except that the income limits for Roth IRA contributions have increased by $1,000.

For the official IRS announcement, click this link to the IRS website.

If you want more clarification on what all of the above means for you, contact us.

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The Advantages of Waiting to Retire at 70

There are a number of reasons why people should think about delaying retirement past the traditional age of 65. The retirement age of 65 was set in 1935 when Congress enacted Social Security and lifespans were much shorter.

Several things have happened in the decades following 1935 that now makes it reasonable for people to delay retiring until age 70. First, the structure of work has changed. Instead of working on a farm or doing heavy lifting in factories, the typical American worker is physically capable of working longer than 65. For the vast majority of workers, there’s more sitting or standing than manual labor. The second factor is the longer lives that U.S. citizens now enjoy. While not universally true, many people do enjoy their jobs do and prefer to go to work instead of sitting around the house or playing endless rounds of golf.

From the financial perspective, it makes even more sense to work past age 65. Monthly Social Security checks increase by 76% just by waiting until age 70 to retire instead of collecting at age 62 (the first year of eligibility) –76%!

As people get older and advance in their careers, their salary often increases with their tenure, meaning that if they leave at age 65, they could be leaving during their peak earning years. By continuing to work they can continue to add to their retirement savings. This is important for people with pensions whose retirement benefits continue to grow the longer they work. And it becomes even more important for people whose retirement is self-funded by their 401(k) plan, IRA or other investment portfolios.

Finally, from a purely actuarial perspective, the longer we work and bring in income, the less time we will spend fully retired and withdrawing from our retirement savings. The greatest fear that people have is running out of money during retirement. Delaying retirement until age 70 or beyond reduces that possibility.

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