Category Archives: Sudden Wealth

Aunt Jennie’s Talents

Image result for image of older woman giving money

The Parable of the Talents is known to everyone who ever attended Sunday school.  A man prepares for a long journey by entrusting three servants with heavy bags of silver (talents) while he is gone.  In those days coins were weighed and a “talent” was about 75 pounds.  He gave 10 talents to one, five to the second and one talent to the third.  The first two servants invested the silver.  The third, being fearful. dug a hole and hid the money for safekeeping.  When the man returned, the first two gave the man twice what had been entrusted to them.  But the third just gave the man his money back.  For this poor stewardship the third servant was cast out.

I was reminded of this story when a lady came to us after receiving an inheritance from her Aunt Jennie.  After being grateful for her good fortune she wondered what to do.  Banks today are paying a pittance on deposits, so putting it in the bank was not all that much different from digging a hole to hide the money from thieves.  She wanted to be a good steward of her inheritance.

She wanted to honor Aunt Jennie by taking care of her money wisely and not squander it.  Aunt Jennie worked hard for her company, spent a lifetime being frugal and made wise investments.  My future client knew her own limitations. She was not an experienced investor.  She had to decide if she wanted to spend her time learning investing from the ground up.  With all the information out there, which expert or school of thought do you listen to?  Did she want to spend her time reading fine print, studying balance sheets or did she want to continue doing those things she enjoyed by finding an experienced professional she could trust to shepherd the money for her.

She chose us because of our caring professionalism.  We listened carefully to her objectives.  We explained the risks and rewards involved in the investing process.  We explained our investment process with the key focus on risk control and wide diversification.  We believe in wise investing, steady growth, and the assurance that your money will keep working for you. With over 30 years’ experience we have weathered all kinds of markets successfully.  Our knowledge and experience allows our clients to focus on those things they enjoy.  They know that their investments will be there for as long as they need them and beyond to help their children and grandchildren.

Aunt Jennie’s talents have grown and our client is happy.  Aunt Jennie would be proud.

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Ex-NFL player, Mega Millions winner press $7.8M claims against Morgan Stanley

What do sports super-stars and lottery winners have in common?  Both are in financial danger.

That’s a strange thing to say about people who are often multi-millionaires.

The problem is that neither the talented athlete nor the lottery winner is usually any good at managing money.  That’s a harsh judgment to make but too many star athletes and lottery winners end up broke.  They end up broke for many of the same reasons:

  • They believe that the financial windfall they have received is inexhaustible.
  • They attract too many groupies and hangers-on who are after their money.
  • They spend the money they have received instead of investing it for their old age.
  • The money they do invest is often lost because of poor, or dishonest, advice.

From Financial Planning magazine:

Former NFL cornerback Asante Samuel and Mega Millions lottery winner James Groves are jointly seeking $7.8 million in damages against Morgan Stanley related to investment recommendations made by a now-barred broker, according to regulatory filings….

Samuel and Groves filed their claims in FINRA arbitration in July, according to a copy of Parthemer’s CRD. From 2003 to 2013, Samuel played for several NFL teams, including the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles. Groves won $168 million in the Mega Millions lottery in 2009.

In this case, Asante Samuel was persuaded to buy a night club, probably hoping to capitalize on his fame as a football player.  It’s fairly common for professional athletes to open restaurants or night clubs.  The problem is that even for professional restauranteurs, the failure rate is shockingly high, and athletes don’t have the training or time to run these businesses.

The story of many lottery winners is one example of ruined lives after another.   Bud Post’s story is not unusual.

When William “Bud” Post won $16.2 million in a 1988 lottery, one of the first things he did was try to please his family, according to this Bankrate article.

Unfortunately, his kin was of the unfriendly sort. Post’s brother hired a hit man to kill him, hoping to inherit some money. Other family members persuaded him to invest in two businesses that ultimately failed. Post’s ex-girlfriend sued him for some of the winnings. Post himself was thrown in jail for firing a gun at a bill collector.

Over time, Post accumulated so much debt that he had to declare bankruptcy. He now relies on Social Security for income. “Lotteries don’t mean (anything) to me,” he is quoted as saying—after he lost all his money.

Is there no hope for professional athletes and lottery winners?  Yes, but it requires them to know their limitations, which may include hiring professional help before they begin spending their new-found wealth.

If you’re a sports star or lottery winner who would like to retire rich, and you want to have someone to talk to about the way you can fend off the vultures that your wealth and fame attract, contact us.  You don’t want to spend your time in court trying to get back what you lost.

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What to do if you win the lottery

Lottery winners so often end up broke that it’s become a common story. If you want to break the curse of the lottery winner here are a few simple things you can do.

1. Lottery winners usually go on a spending binge because they now have more money that they ever imagined. This leads them to believe their new-found wealth is endless. It’s not. Kings, potentates, even countries (see Greece) have gone broke; even billionaires can run out of money. The financial object of a lottery winner should be to insure that then never end up broke, even if they live a long time. There are ways of insuring that you won’t run out of money. The first thing you need to do after receiving that check is to get a good, honest financial advisor.

2. Lottery winners attract people like bees to honey. These can be relatives, friends, strangers who heard about the winner’s good fortune. They want gifts (and you want to give them), they expect you to pick up the check. The most dangerous are the people who come to you with “deals” that will make you even richer. One of the best ways to handle this is to refer everyone to your financial advisor; explain that he’s the person who’s handling your finances. That way you are not the one turning anyone away.

3. Lottery winners have tax issues that they never had before. Before accepting that check, it’s a good idea to organize a small team – quarterbacked by your financial advisor – that includes a including a CPA and an attorney.

Buying a lottery ticket is not a wise investment. If you beat astronomical odds and win, you are the same person you were before even though people will suddenly find you incredibly witty, smart and good looking. But if you must buy a ticket – and win – keep these ideas in mind.

 

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Would you invest with a billionaire hedge fund manager who made a fortune during the housing crisis?

Watch out.

Many people would jump at the chance and many wealthy people have given John Paulson lots of money to invest for them.

But there’s a downside to trying to get rich via the stock market. The people who “swing for the fences” often strike out.

We found this article in Private Wealth an excellent illustration of this point.

Billionaire John Paulson posted the second-worst trading year of his career in 2014 as a wrong-way energy bet added to declines tied to a failed merger and investments in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

The worst performance was in the Advantage Plus fund, which plummeted 36 percent last year, two people with knowledge of the returns said. …

Paulson & Co.’s performance placed it near the bottom of the hedge fund pack last year as the industry returned a meager 1.4 percent. The manager, who shot to fame after making $15 billion on the housing crisis in 2007, has struggled to regain its footing since 2011 when bets on the U.S. recovery went awry, losing money in all of its main strategies — including a 51 percent tumble in the Advantage Plus fund. Paulson also lost money in investments tied to gold and Europe’s economy, causing assets to dwindle to $19 billion, half the peak in 2011 ….…

Investors in the Advantage fund have lost 48 percent since the end of 2010, while clients in Advantage Plus are down more than 66 percent. ….

At Korving & Company, we are fiduciaries, Paulson is not.  He’s a hedge fund manager who makes big bets.  We don’t bet, we invest.

We manage retirement money. People nearing retirement don’t want to see the money they are saving cut in half. That could force them to work years longer than they planned. People in retirement who saw their savings plummet would have no choice but to reduce their lifestyle.

With that in mind, we do the opposite of Paulson. Our primary directive is keeping what we have and making a fair rate of return on that money by a carefully thought out process of diversification.

Realizing that even the smartest or luckiest investors – like Paulson – can be wrong, we focus on picking good funds but making sure that if any of our fund managers has a bad year, our clients will not have their plans interrupted or their lifestyles affected.

To go back to our baseball analogy, we just want to get on base and do so consistently.

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What Rich People Need to Know

I ran across an article at Market Watch titled “Ten things rich people know that you don’t.”  It listed the usual things:

  • Start saving early
  • Automate your savings
  • Maximize contributions to 401(k)s
  • Don’t carry credit card debt
  • Live below your means
  • Educate yourself about investing
  • Diversify
  • Hire a qualified financial advisor

All of that is something to take to heart when you’re young and just starting in life.  But what do people who are already rich need to know?

Lots of people get rich without following the rules.  They may start a successful business, enter a highly compensated profession, climb the corporate ladder, win the lottery, become a sports star or inherit a fortune.   Once you are rich, the number one objective for most people is to stay rich.  One very successful financial advisor with just 28 very wealthy clients said

“People don’t come to me to get rich, they come to me to stay rich.”

That’s the role of a good financial advisor.   Their job is to  do more than manage their client’s portfolios, it’s to take care that all of the other boxes are checked off:  to diversify the client portfolio, to educate the client about investing, to see to it that they live within their means.  In many cases they take care of family issues, lifestyle issues; the kinds of things that family offices do.

It’s what we do.  It’s what our clients expect.

Have a wealth maintenance question?   Contact us.

 

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What Sports Stars and Lottery Winners Have In Common

According to a story in Yahoo Finance:

Former NBA player, Antoine Walker, 38, earned over $110 million throughout his NBA career, more than four times the average player in the league. All that money, though, didn’t stop this All-Star from going broke.

Walker’s financial problems began his first year in the league as a 19-year-old rookie with the Boston Celtics in 1996. Although he had a financial advisor help him establish a plan for his long-term finances, Walker had other ideas about what he wanted to do with his newfound wealth.

“Through my young arrogance, being ignorant to a degree and being stubborn and wanting to do my own thing with my money, I went against a lot of his wishes,” Walker told Yahoo Finance.

The rest of the story is predictable. Walker spent lavishly on his relatives, buying them multi-million dollar houses and expensive luxury cars. He spent lots of money on himself and got himself a “posse”

His generosity extended beyond his family to his many friends and acquaintances. From lavish all-expenses-paid trips to luxury gifts for his friends, Walker made sure everyone in his circle enjoyed the lifestyle he led. With his fellow NBA players, Walker gambled extensively – losing $646,900 in just two years.

He then made things worse by going into debt, “investing” in real estate. For a financial rookie he poured money into things he didn’t understand, undoubtedly persuaded by sales people who saw a naïve man with lots of money.

…Walker had a plan to put his income to work and bought more than 140 properties along the South Side of Chicago. Whether it was land to build on or commercial and income properties, Walker had a full-range of real estate investments meant to maintain the lifestyle he had built for his family after retiring from the league.
With the housing bubble and bust, Walker found himself defaulting on loans where he was the personal guarantor, losing value on land, and failed to get a handle on the legal issues that followed.

He finally declared bankruptcy, with liabilities exceeding assets by over $8 million.

This is almost exactly the same path that most lottery winners walk. Unaccustomed to their sudden wealth, they buy things for themselves, their families, their friends and anyone who has a hard-luck story. If they are especially unlucky, they get sold “investments” like real estate that they don’t understand, on credit. That is a recipe for disaster. They imagine that the pot of gold they found is unlimited. It isn’t.

They may find a financial advisor. A good financial advisor will tell them “no.” But people who come into sudden wealth rarely take no for an answer. So they ignore the financial advisor. It really doesn’t take that long to run through millions of dollars.

So what’s the lottery winner or the next highly paid sports star to do? The first thing is to realize that there is no such thing as unlimited wealth. The second thing is to learn to say “no” and get a good financial advisor who will say that for you.

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The Biggest Problem for Wealthy Families

I recently visited a house that was once the largest private residence in the country: the “Biltmore” mansion. It was built by the grandson of the founder, “Commodore” Cornelius Vanderbilt, who built the original family fortune. His son doubled the fortune which, in today’s dollars would be worth $300 billion, making the family one of the ten richest in human history. But the heirs managed to run through this immense wealth.

Biltmore

Within just 30 years of the death of the Commodore no member of the Vanderbilt family was among the richest in the US. And 48 years after his death, one of his grandchildren is said to have died penniless.

In less than a single generation the surviving Vanderbilts had spent the majority of their family wealth!

No one today is that wealthy, but there is a lesson here for those who have accumulated multimillion dollar fortunes. While families today will openly discuss formerly taboo subjects like same-sex marriage and drug use, talking about family wealth seems to be harder to discuss.

Most wealthy people have wills and trusts but a substantial number of children have no idea of how much money their parents have. I have experienced this frequently in our practice when we disclose to heirs how much money they are actually inheriting. This applies not just to the wealthy but also the moderately “comfortable.”

According to a recent study, approximately 80% to 90% of families who have inheritable wealth have an up-to-date will. Only about half have discussed their inheritance with their children.

The reasons why parents don’t talk about money with their children range from not thinking it’s important, don’t want children to feel entitled, or they just don’t talk about money.

The problem is that the receipt of sudden wealth can have a deleterious affect on people. Too often a family fortune that has been created with great effort is squandered by people who have no idea that their inheritance is finite.

What can be done? Creating an environment and venue where family wealth can be discussed can be facilitated by a family’s financial advisor, ideally a Registered Investment Advisor – rather than a broker – who has the best interest of the family at heart.

If you need someone who can help you talk about money with your heirs, give us a call. We’ll be happy to help.

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If you’re rich, will your kids stay rich?

Different countries have different ways of expressing the same beliefs about wealth: “Shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations” is the one I most often hear. In Japan, it’s “Rice paddies to rice paddies in three generations”. In China, “Wealth never survives three generations.” In fact, for 70% of all wealthy families, the money has been spent, or otherwise lost before the end of the second generation.

People who have enough money to consider themselves, ‘rich” – those with at least $10 million — worry about their kids squandering the money they’re given or inherited.

According to a study by U.S. Trust, 75% of families worth over $5 million made it on their own. In other words, they built it, mostly by starting a successful business.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t mean that their kids are equally smart or hard working. And it doesn’t mean that their parents are wise investors.

That means there’s a market out there for advisors who can teach the kids (and often the parents) the ins and outs of investing. This provides these families with the means to keep the wealth they have earned and keep it for the next generation, and the next after that.

But just as important is passing on the social, intellectual and spiritual capital that created the wealth in the first place. Too often the children of wealthy families fail to appreciate the work and sacrifice it took to create that wealth, and assume it will always be there for them.

At Korving & Company often serve several generations of the same family. If you have concerns about your children’s ability to manage money, call us for a consultation.

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Warren Buffett and You.

An interesting, and instructive, article in Investment Advisor magazine made some great points about the Buffett legend.  Like most legends, it’s part truth and part myth.  In Buffett’s case there is more myth than truth.

Don’t get me wrong, Buffett is one of the world’s richest men, and a famous investor.  But it’s not a rags-to-riches story.  Son of a Congressman, young Warren had an elite education.  He bought a farm while in high school, not something you can do with the income from a paper route.

The legend is that he’s just a folksy stock picker with a buy-and-hold strategy.  The truth is that he made his first millions as a hedge fund manager, raking off 25% of the profits over a 6% hurdle rate.  His most famous investments came from bailing out firms in distress like GE and GEICO when they were in financial trouble.  Buffett got sweetheart deals from them because he had them by the throat and could lend them billions of dollars when they needed it fast.

That’s the edge that Buffett has that none of my other readers have. (Hi Warren)

One observer of Buffett wrote:

By oversimplifying this glorified investor named Buffett the general public gets the false perception that portfolio management is so easy a caveman can do it. And so we see commercials with babies trading from their cribs and middle aged men trading an account in their free time.

If you’re not Warren Buffett, what should your objective be with your investments?  Think about your goals.  See if they are reasonable.  Determine what it will take to get you there.  If you need help with this, get the advice of a professional.  If you are fortunate enough to have already reached your financial goals, decide what it takes to make sure you don’t lose it.

And then, unless you are determined to make a career out of investment management, hire a competent, credentialed, experienced, fee-only Registered Investment Advisor to manage your portfolio for you.  In other words, call Korving & Company – today – and make an appointment.

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Private Jet Flying – now by the seat.

Have you daydreamed about at least taking a ride in a private jet?  In the beginning, unless you were flying somewhere on a company plane, the only way you were going to ride on a private jet was to buy one.  If you are one of the ultra-rich, like Oprah Winfrey, that was your only option.  Since that was out of the reach of even the common multi-millionaire, the industry developed the shared lease program where you bought a number of hours of flying time on a jet you shared with others, the plane being owned by the leasing company, like Net Jets.  But that still costs hundreds of thousands of dollars.  The newest concept is the “per-seat charter” where you share the ride with others who have bought their seats on the same ride.

As a per-seat traveler, you give up the luxury of having the cabin to yourself, the control of specifying when you want to take off and, in some cases, what airports you want to use. But you still avoid hassles ranging from security lines to the delays and cancellations that come with airline travel. And per-seat savings over traditional charter can be considerable. BlackJet guarantees a seat on a Los Angeles–New York flight for $3,500, its highest fare. Xojet, which helped bring transparent, point-to-point pricing to the charter industry, charges $25,300 or more for that route. And per-seat providers pledge to maintain the quality level associated with charter.

If you’re among those who have always wanted to have the experience, let us know.  We provide a great many concierge services for our clients.

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