Category Archives: Fiduciary

Planning makes a difference

Happy senior couple walking on beach

Do you want to have fun in retirement?  Planning can make the difference and it doesn’t have to be difficult.  Working with a financial professional that understands your retirement goals can help you create a plan to make the most of your money – now and in retirement.

The partners at Korving and Company are Certified Financial Planning™ professionals – fiduciaries – who specialize in retirement.  We help people plan their retirement and continue to work with them during retirement.

There are 5 reasons why you should work with a financial professional to create a retirement plan.

  1. Focus on your goals in retirement and how you will pay for them.
  2. Address your concerns and expectations for retirement.
  3. Identify things that could pose a threat to your retirement and manage them.
  4. Feel more educated, confident and in control of your financial future.
  5. To help you navigate the complexity of financially moving into retirement.

 

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A good Registered Investment Advisor is a “Life Coach.”

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People who are not familiar with Registered Investment Advisors (RIAs) too often view them as stock brokers.  They are not; they are held to a higher standard and are focused on the client, not the money.  RIAs are trusted advisors who put their clients ahead of themselves.    They are fiduciaries that are skilled in the art making good financial decisions.

Younger professionals who are building careers would do well to find an RIA as their financial guru, a “Life Coach.”  It takes time, experience and a high level of expertise to manage money well.  The young lack that expertise but have the biggest advantage of all: time.  They are in a perfect position to build wealth with the least amount of effort if they can lean on experts who can show them how to navigate the risky ocean of investing.  Just as important, they need a wise guide who can advise them on managing their income.  Too many people, even those with six figure salaries, live paycheck to paycheck.  Knowing what to spend and how to save is the role of the advisor.

This is very important for the independent professional – the doctor or lawyer.  Focused on building a practice, they need someone to advise them on managing their money wisely.

For the business owner, the entrepreneur, it’s even more important.  There is no career track and the challenge of building a business often results in poor money management.  Excessive debt can lead to bankruptcy, a common result in many industries that depend on debt financing.  A good advisor can help the business owner create a personal portfolio that’s independent of his business.  At the same time he can advise the owner the best way of financing his growth.

Once the business is established the owner needs guidance setting up retirement and benefit plans for himself and his employees.  This all part of the RIA’s skill set. And finally, as the business matures and the owner starts thinking of retirement, the advisor provides the guidance to transition the individual and his family to life beyond work.

That’s the point at which the coach gets the pleasure of knowing he’s done a good job as part of a winning team.

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The financial risks of dementia

dementia-symptoms-and-brain changes

Dementia covers a broad range of mental diseases that cause a gradual decrease in the ability to think and remember.  It often affects a person’s daily functioning and is different from the decline in cognitive abilities that are the usual effects of aging.  The most common type of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease.

About one in ten people get dementia.  It becomes more common with age and it’s estimated that about half of those over age 85 suffer from it in some degree.

As the disease progresses, most people with dementia require a certain amount of skilled care.  Eventually the family will not be able to provide the 24 hour services that the patient requires and they will be placed in a facility designed to provide that care.

According to the NY Times:

On average, the out-of-pocket cost for a patient with dementia was $61,522 — more than 80 percent higher than the cost for someone with heart disease or cancer. The reason is that dementia patients need caregivers to watch them, help with basic activities like eating, dressing and bathing, and provide constant supervision to make sure they do not wander off or harm themselves. None of those costs were covered by Medicare.

For many families, the cost of caring for a dementia patient often “consumed almost their entire household wealth,” said Dr. Amy S. Kelley, a geriatrician at Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai in New York and the lead author of a paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

As people age their cognitive abilities deteriorate.  Even before they begin to suffer the effects of dementia, they may become forgetful or lose the ability to focus on their finances.  Obtaining the services of a Registered Investment Advisor (RIA) well before this happens – a fiduciary that puts his clients’ interests first – is vital.  And, as people prepare retirement plans, the cost of dementia treatment and care should be one of the things for which they plan.

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Who do you trust?

The latest issue of Wealth Management magazine dealt with the upcoming election.

One of the more interesting things about our recent presidential election (and it’s a long list) is that the traditional political battle lines have not only moved, they’ve been decimated—broken into such unrecognizable shapes that the head spins.

What the Editor found interesting is that neither candidate projects warm feelings toward Wall Street for different reasons.

For both parties and their supporters, Wall Street, and by extension financial services, is to be viewed with deep suspicion and skepticism.

The editor finds this troubling.  We’re not so sure.  When you turn your financial affairs over to another there has to be a certain level of trust.  However that trust must be reinforced over time and “Wall Street” has done enough damage to the trust that people have placed in it that it deserves to be viewed with suspicion and skepticism.

Trust is generated when promises made are promises kept.   The problem is that too often the promises that the major Wall Street firms have made were deceptive.  Wall Street firms like to pretend that they have the best interests of their clients in mind.  The truth is that the firms view their clients as customers and their brokers as the sales force.  The object is to generate commissions via the sales of products created to generate profits for the firm.  And if it benefits the client, that’s nice but it’s a by-product of the sales effort.

That’s why the growth of independent Registered Investment Advisory firms has been a good thing for people seeking investment advice that they can trust.  RIAs who charge fees for their services are not compensated for selling Wall Street products.  Because they work for their clients, not for Wall Street firms, they do not have divided loyalties.  They are supposed to be fiduciaries, not salesmen.  Not to say that there are no bad apples in the basket, but the vast majority of them will work to earn your trust.

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How QB Mark Sanchez was sacked by a financial adviser

NFL quarterback Mark Sanchez was allegedly cheated out of about $33 million by Ash Narayan, who worked for RGT Capital Management for nearly 20 years. Image: Associated Press

This article from Financial Planning caught my eye:

NFL quarterback Mark Sanchez and major league baseball pitchers Jake Peavy and Roy Oswalt were allegedly cheated out of about $33 million by Ash Narayan, who worked for RGT Capital Management for nearly 20 years, the SEC has charged.

Narayan “secretly siphon[ed] millions of dollars from accounts he managed for professional athletes,” the SEC alleged.

When you hire someone to manage your money you trust that they will serve you honestly and ethically.  Unfortunately, that trust is sometimes betrayed, which gives the financial services industry a black eye.

One of the things that we can pass along to our friends and clients are lessons learned.  In this particular case, Narayan put a lot of his clients’ money into a struggling internet firm in which he had a financial stake.  That is a huge conflict of interest and should be a red flag for anyone who hires a financial advisor.

Sanchez hired Narayan partly because they attended the same church.  We have seen several instances where people entrusted their money with advisors who were part of the church, the club or another affinity group without checking further.  When hiring an advisor you cannot assume that people close to you have your best interest at heart.  Even family members will take advantage of other members of the family.

If you want a brochure that tells you how to choose a financial advisor, contact us.  We are fiduciaries.

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Independent Wealth Managers vs. Wirehouses

If you had the choice, would you rather shop at a boutique or a chain store?  You know what you get at a chain store: pre-packaged products on shelves that meet most of your needs but no personal service.  A boutique provides you with a lot more product selection, a high level of personal service and saves you time in meeting your needs.

The reason that so many people go to chain stores for groceries, hardware and clothing is that they usually offer lower prices. The interesting thing about the financial services industry is that the “chain stores” (the industry calls them “wirehouses”) like Merrill Lynch, UBS, Wells Fargo are not cheaper than financial boutiques.

These boutiques go by other names such as “Registered Investment Advisors” (RIAs) or “Independent Wealth Managers.”   But they are all focused on satisfying their customers, not on the sale.  They are true servants to their customers.  While wirehouses give the impression of size, the are limited to selling the products they have on their shelves.  They can’t suggest you shop down the street for a product that’s better for you.  RIAs are fiduciaries, meaning they put their clients’ interests ahead of their own.  They focus on what’s best for the customer rather than the sale.

According to a survey by Cerulli Associates, over half of the ultra-high-net-worth clients still have their assets at wirehouses or bank trust departments.  That is changing as younger investors or the heirs of the older investors seek the kind of personal service that RIAs and Independent Wealth Managers provide.

If you’re looking for boutique service without paying more for it, contact us.

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The Fiduciary Rule and You

The Department of Labor (DOL) has issued its final version of the fiduciary rule regarding retirement accounts.  The issue that the DOL is trying to address is that broker-dealers (major investment firms like MLPFS, UBS, etc.) do not have to act in their clients’ best interest.  They only have make recommendations that are “suitable.”  What that means is that if a broker-dealer representative has the choice between recommending two investments, they can recommend the one that pays them more, as long as the recommendation is suitable. That may not be in the client’s best interest.

The “fiduciary” standard requires an investment advisor to recommend the investment that is in the best interest of the client.  That often results in lower costs to clients.  Korving & Company is a pure RIA (Registered Investment Advisor) and is a fiduciary.   We do not offer commission-based products and offer our clients the lowest cost versions of appropriate investments.

The DOL rules apply to retirement accounts like 401(k) and IRAs.

For questions about the fiduciary rule, contact us.

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Questions to ask when interviewing a financial advisor

A previous post referred to an excellent article on CNBC about financial advisors .  You first have to consider what kind of financial advice you want or need.

Once you determine the kind of advice you’re looking for, here are some key questions to ask when interviewing the financial advisor.

  • What are the services I am hiring you to perform?

  • What are your conflicts of interest?

  • Identify for me all of the ways you or your firm are compensated by me or by any other party in connection with services rendered to me or my assets.

  • Do you have a fiduciary duty to act in my best interests?

  • Describe your insurance coverage.

We’ll add a few more of our own:

  • What is your investment philosophy?
  • Do you do your own investing or do you use outside firms?
  • What kind of experience do you have?
  • Are your other clients similar to me?

If you don’t get straight-forward answers to these questions, go on to your next candidate.

Feel free to ask us questions.

 

How Do I Start Saving and Making My Money Grow?

We contribute to several forums that provide advice to novice investors. One of the most popular questions goes like this:

• I’m 28 and will start a new job soon. I have accumulated $10,000 in a savings account and will be able to save an additional $1000/month when I start my new job. I need advice on how to start an investment plan.

It’s a good question. The person asking it usually has some money in the bank and has enough income to add to his or her savings. But because interest rates are so low the savings are not growing. There are three common reasons for not starting an investment program.

Not knowing where to start. The mechanics of opening an investment account can be complicated.

Fear of making a mistake. People work hard for their money and don’t want to lose if because they made some rookie error.

Not knowing who to trust. Who will provide good, honest advice for you?

Here’s how to begin an investment plan that works for people of all ages.

  • Find a Registered Investment Advisor (RIA) who is a fiduciary: who put their clients’ interests ahead of their own and provide unbiased investment guidance. They will help you through the process.
  • Find someone with experience. You don’t want to deal with someone who’s learning with your money.
  • Find someone who is accredited. A CFP™ (Certified Financial Planner) is trained to give advice on all aspects of financial planning.
  • Find someone who does not charge commissions. It eliminates conflicts of interest.
  • Find someone who has a good reputation in the community.

At Korving & Company, we’ve been helping people just like you make better decisions about their money and their lives for thirty years.

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Are fees really the enemy?

The popular press puts a great deal of emphasis on the costs and expenses of mutual funds and investment advice. I am price conscious and shop around for many things. All things being equal, I prefer to pay less rather than more. However, all things are rarely equal. Hamburger is not steak. A Cadillac is not the same as a used Yugo.

The disadvantage facing most investors is that today’s investment market is not your father’s market. Those words are not even mine; they come from a doctor I was speaking to recently who uses an investment firm to manage his money. His portfolio represents his retirement, and it is very important to him. He knows his limitations and knows when to consult a professional. It’s not that he isn’t smart; it’s that he’s smart enough to realize that he doesn’t have the expertise or the time to do the job as well as an investment professional.

As Registered Investment Advisors, we are fiduciaries; we have the legal responsibility to abide by the prudence rule (as opposed to brokers, who only have to abide by a suitability rule). Some interpret our responsibility as meaning that we should choose investments that cost as little as possible, going for the cheapest option. But do you always purchase something exclusively on the lowest cost without taking features, quality, or your personal preferences into consideration?

As I drive to work each day, I pass an auto dealership featuring a new car with a price tag of $9,999 prominently displayed. I’m never tempted to stop in and buy this car, despite its low price. It does not meet my needs nor does it have the features that I’m looking for in a new car. Why would an investment be any different? Too many investors believe that there is no difference between various stocks, mutual funds or investment advisors. They focus exclusively on price and ignore risk, diversification, asset allocation and quality. People who go to great lengths to check out the features on the cars they buy often don’t know what’s in the mutual funds they own. Yet these are the things that often determine how well they will live in retirement. It’s this knowledge that professional investment managers bring to the table.

People who would never diagnose their own illness or write their own will are too often persuaded to roll the dice on their retirement. Don’t make that same mistake with your investments.

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