Category Archives: family owned

The Trend: Fewer “Self-Directed” and More “Advisor-Reliant” Investors

According to Cerulli Associates more households rely on advisors than ever before.

Since 2010, the households classified as “self-directed” investors had shrunk from 45% to 33%, while households termed by Cerulli as “advisor-reliant” investors — regularly consulting with an advisor — had grown from 34% to 43%.  What drives this trend?

I can think of several reasons.  Two that come readily to mind are:

  • the increasing complexity of financial markets and
  • the number of dramatic financial shocks that people have experienced in the last 15 years.

I can remember a time, back in the 20th Century, when “investing” meant calling a well-know investment firm and buying a stock, like General Motors.  Well, good old GM went bankrupt a few years ago and since then about 25,000 mutual funds have appeared.  In addition there are options, derivatives, structured products, and – of course – ETFs (exchange traded funds).  And that’s just here in the good old USA.  But there’s a whole world out there that people can invest in: foreign stocks, foreign funds, world stock funds, emerging markets, commodities, to say nothing of foreign bonds and currencies.

Few people have the time to study all of these, so the rational thing to do is to find a financial advisor to help you make sense of it.

And then there are the financial disasters that decimated many self-direct portfolios.  In the year 2000 the dot-com bubble collapsed, devastating the portfolios of those riding the tech boom.  And who can forget the housing bubble that led to the financial crash of 2008, wiping out some of the major banks and investment firms and ending the dreams of a comfortable retirement for many people?  Professional advice should be concerned with risk control as their first objective, followed by getting a fair rate of return on your invested assets.

During all this time, financial advisors who were once employees of the major investment firms decided that they could best serve their clients by declaring their independence.  They set up their own firms, becoming Registered Investment Advisors (RIAs) offering fiduciary services.  That is another development that has helped to make financial advice more accessible to individuals and families, the mom and pops of the investment world.

If you’re one of the shrinking do-it-yourself crowd, check us out and see why you may be much more comfortable with us as your advisor.  And if you are one of those with an advisor but wonder if you could do better, feel free to get a second opinion.  We’re a family firm.  We deal with several generations of families that look to us for guidance.  We look forward to hearing from you.

SBOY-banner ad2

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How well do couples communicate on money? – Part 6

Most couples think they communicate well, but research indicates otherwise when it comes to finances. Communication on financial issues between couples is especially poor, as we have discovered in previous essays.

Couples were asked what advice they would give to newlyweds and young couples about finances. Newlyweds usually do not put frank talk about finances at the top of their “to-do” list. That may be a big mistake.

The most common suggestions for young couples starting out in life together were:

  • Save as early as possible for retirement (57%).
  • Make all financial decisions together (41%).
  • Make a budget and stick to it (39%).
  • Make sure you have an emergency fund (38%).
  • Don’t hide expenditures (28%).
  • Disclose income, debts and assets early (24%).

One of the easiest ways of accomplishing all of these objectives is for young couples to consult a financial advisor as soon as possible. By doing so they will reveal their finances to each other, develop a budget that matches their income, agree on an investment strategy, and be given a roadmap to long-term financial peace.

Our final essay on this subject will summarize what we have learned.

Korving & Company, the 2015 Suffolk Small Business of the Year is a family owned investment management and financial planning firm. We deliver a very personal level of service to guide, empower and assure our clients that their money is carefully managed to meet their long-term life goals.

SBOY-banner ad2

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

How well do couples communicate on money? – Part 5

Most couples think they communicate well, but research indicates otherwise when it comes to finances. Communication on financial issues between couples is especially poor, as we have discovered in previous essays. Despite concerns about medical costs, running out of money, inflation and Social Security, most couples have not created a plan to deal with these worries.

The 20% of couples who have created a plan get the benefit of peace of mind, less stress, and a more cohesive relationship. Uncertainty and doubt around important financial issues creates stress within relationships.

Couples who have a retirement plan in place:

  • Are twice as likely to live a very comfortable retirement.
  • Are 50% more likely to be “completely confident” in assuming responsibility for retirement.
  • Are much more confident that their partner will be OK in retirement.
  • Are twice as likely to know how much they will need in retirement.
  • Are less concerned about unexpected health care costs.
  • Are much less likely to be concerned about outliving their savings.

Having a plan to reach your goals is much like going to the grocery store with a shopping list. You know what you need and are less likely to forget important items, nor are you as likely to buy things you don’t need.

Creating a plan forces couples to be open with each other about their goals, their finances, and the issues that may keep them from achieving those goals. Working with a Certified Financial Planner™ (CFP) to create a plan also brings an important measure of reality to the process. Professional guidance creates realistic assumptions about how much should be saved and the rate at which it should grow. A CFP can also help mediate differences between couples when issues arise.

Our next essay will focus on advice to young couples.

Korving & Company, the 2015 Suffolk Small Business of the Year is a family owned investment management and financial planning firm. We deliver a very personal level of service to guide, empower and assure our clients that their money is carefully managed to meet their long-term life goals.

SBOY-banner ad2

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

How well do couples communicate on money? – Part 4

Most couples think they communicate well, but research indicates that communication about finances is often not good. In our previous essays we have discussed common financial disagreements.

In this essay we will discuss some of the financial worries couples have.

Nearly three-quarters (74%) of couples worry about unexpected health care costs. For more than half, it’s their top concern. With people living longer than ever before, advances in medical technology and the skyrocketing cost of health care, this concern comes as not real surprise.

After health care, the next biggest concern for couples (51%) was outliving their retirement savings.

The negative effects of inflation and concerns that Social Security may run out were the next biggest concerns.

Despite these worries, only 20% of couples actually have a plan in place to address these issues! And over one-third (36%) haven’t even thought about planning!

Our next essay will take a look at those couples who have taken the time to create a financial plan.

Korving & Company, the 2015 Suffolk Small Business of the Year is a family owned investment management and financial planning firm. We deliver a very personal level of service to guide, empower and assure our clients that their money is carefully managed to meet their long-term life goals.

SBOY-banner ad2

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

How well do couples communicate on money? – Part 2

Most couples think they communicate well, but research indicates otherwise when it comes to finances. Of course, talking about finances can be a minefield. If one partner is frugal and the other spends freely, tensions can be high. Disagreements about money are one of the leading causes of divorce.

More than four out of ten couples (43%) did not know how much their partner makes. Many were off by over $25,000! This can have serious effects. If you don’t know how much income you make as a couple, how do you know how much you can reasonably spend?

Unless couples lead totally separate financial lives, not knowing how much they are earning together can lead to a lack of savings or even debt. This issue could be behind the alarmingly high amount of debt that people carry, often at exorbitant rates.

More than one-third (36%) of couples disagree on the amount of investable money they have. This usually happens when there is a division of labor between couples, where one partner is in charge of the investments.

However, our experience indicates that couples also disagree on the kinds of investments that are appropriate. In general, men tend to prefer riskier investments that women. This can lead to a good deal of stress and disagreement.

Our next essay will take a look at couples in retirement.

Korving & Company, the 2015 Suffolk Small Business of the Year is a family owned investment management and financial planning firm. We deliver a very personal level of service to guide, empower and assure our clients that their money is carefully managed to meet their long-term life goals.

SBOY-banner ad2

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Korving & Company – Suffolk Small Business of the Year

We are very proud that Korving & Company has been named Suffolk Small Business of the Year by the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce (HRCC).

HRCC Suffolk SBOY award 2015

We were honored at a luncheon on Norfolk sponsored by the HRCC on June 12th. Pictures of the event can be found on our Facebook page.

Here is what Inside Business had to say about us:

Father-and-son duo Arie and Stephen Korving have more than four decades of experience in financial advising between the two of them.

Arie Korving entered the business in 1986, working for a global wealth management firm, and Stephen joined him at the firm in 2004, after working in institutional money management. Branching out to start Korving & Co. in 2010 gave them the opportunity to provide individualized financial advice to clients. Their purpose is managing money but putting people first is at the core of what they do.

“We know our clients,” Stephen said. “We manage money for them to help them achieve what it is they want.”
Today, they have clients in every stage and circumstance of life, from the widow in an assisted living facility to the corporate executive. The common denominator among clients is that they remain with Korving & Co. for a long time, some for over 20 years.

Because of Arie’s establishment in the industry and his ability to maintain relationships, they are not just nationwide but across countries, Stephen said. Given the nature of how they invest, long distance relationships with clients have never been an impediment.

“We are a family business that works with families,” Stephen said. “We do for our clients what we would do for our family members if they were in the clients’ situation.”

“We decided to run this business to help people achieve their goals and we want to do it in a highly ethical, highly transparent way,” Arie added.

It is this type of personalized guidance that has kept the company increasing at 15 percent to 20 percent per year, a rate that they want to continue to see as long as it provides the opportunity to work with people in a meaningful and impactful way.

This principle was further established during the market crashes of 2000 and 2008, after which the company decided to become totally independent of large investment firms, allowing them to provide service based on their clients’ needs.

“It really resonates with people when you can say let’s find what you really want to do rather than what the market wants to do,” Arie said. “That type of risk control is an important service we offer.”

Located in Suffolk, they are truly a small business by choice with only one other employee beside themselves on payroll. By staying small, they are able to grow in relationships and be involved in the community, Stephen said.
Arie recently published a book, “Before I Go,” which shares his life experiences from an educational standpoint. They also have had articles in local publications and are currently rated No. 4 in financial blogging in Virginia and in the top 100 in the U.S….

Their bottom line is helping people. “We can continue to grow in the amount of money we manage, but we want to maintain the very personal relationships we have with people,” Arie said.
“People never want to think of themselves as a number.”

We welcome your inquiries.

Tagged , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: