Category Archives: About us

Aunt Jennie’s Talents

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The Parable of the Talents is known to everyone who ever attended Sunday school.  A man prepares for a long journey by entrusting three servants with heavy bags of silver (talents) while he is gone.  In those days coins were weighed and a “talent” was about 75 pounds.  He gave 10 talents to one, five to the second and one talent to the third.  The first two servants invested the silver.  The third, being fearful. dug a hole and hid the money for safekeeping.  When the man returned, the first two gave the man twice what had been entrusted to them.  But the third just gave the man his money back.  For this poor stewardship the third servant was cast out.

I was reminded of this story when a lady came to us after receiving an inheritance from her Aunt Jennie.  After being grateful for her good fortune she wondered what to do.  Banks today are paying a pittance on deposits, so putting it in the bank was not all that much different from digging a hole to hide the money from thieves.  She wanted to be a good steward of her inheritance.

She wanted to honor Aunt Jennie by taking care of her money wisely and not squander it.  Aunt Jennie worked hard for her company, spent a lifetime being frugal and made wise investments.  My future client knew her own limitations. She was not an experienced investor.  She had to decide if she wanted to spend her time learning investing from the ground up.  With all the information out there, which expert or school of thought do you listen to?  Did she want to spend her time reading fine print, studying balance sheets or did she want to continue doing those things she enjoyed by finding an experienced professional she could trust to shepherd the money for her.

She chose us because of our caring professionalism.  We listened carefully to her objectives.  We explained the risks and rewards involved in the investing process.  We explained our investment process with the key focus on risk control and wide diversification.  We believe in wise investing, steady growth, and the assurance that your money will keep working for you. With over 30 years’ experience we have weathered all kinds of markets successfully.  Our knowledge and experience allows our clients to focus on those things they enjoy.  They know that their investments will be there for as long as they need them and beyond to help their children and grandchildren.

Aunt Jennie’s talents have grown and our client is happy.  Aunt Jennie would be proud.

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At what age are you too old to manage your money?

I was fascinated to read an article with the above title that was published recently.  It was accompanied by a picture of an elderly couple and their caregiver walking with canes.

The article reflects many of our own observations.  We have been managing money for people for over thirty years.  During that time we have seen the effect of age and ill health on the people we work with.

Here’s the good news:

“Most people who don’t suffer from cognitive impairment can continue managing their money in their 70s and 80s, according to a report just published by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR). But of course some older Americans, and especially financial novices who take over money management after the death of a spouse, will need help …”

Here’s the bad news:

As we get older our ability to process information slows down.  As a result, the elderly are more likely to be defrauded or abused by financial scams.  They may not open their mail regularly, have problems paying bills and fail to read and understand their financial statements and reports.

If you’ve never made investment decisions, paid the bills, balanced the family checkbook or reviewed the investment accounts you are especially vulnerable.  This if often true of older couples in which the wife managed the household and the husband managed the family finances.

As we get older, there are a few basic things that we should do to protect ourselves and our loved ones.

  1. Have a spending plan for your retirement years.
  2. Make sure that your spouse and your financial advisor knows about the plan and knows where your accounts are so that they can be monitored for fraud or abuse.
  3. At some point you or your spouse should agree to transfer your responsibility for managing your investments, and make sure that both members of a couple should know how to run the household finances.

For guidance on these issues, we suggest ordering a copy of BEFORE I GO and BEFORE I GO WORKBOOK.

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Retirement statistics

  • 65 – The age at which the average American expects to retire, up from 63 in 2002.
  • 26 – Percentage of baby boomers who expect to retire at age 70 or later.
  • $265,000 – the estimated amount a couple, both age 65, should expect to spend on health care.
  • 22 – Percentage of couples who factor health care costs into retirement.
  • 30 – Percentage of adults born in the 1940s and 1950s who have traditional pension plans.
  • 11 – Percentage of adults born in the 1980s who are expected to have a traditional pension plan.
  • 60 – Percentage of medical expenses that Medicare by itself covers.

If some of these statistics don’t scare you read them again.

For others, we may be able to help.

And read the first three chapters of Before I Go.

 

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How much annual retirement income will you have?

Most people believe that their home is their most expensive thing they’ll ever pay for.  They’re wrong.  The most expensive thing people ever pay for is retirement. And they’ll pay for it after they quit working.

That’s why it’s important to have a clear idea of what you’re getting into before you decide to tell your employer that you’re leaving.

The typical retiree’s sources of income include Social Security.  They may have a pension, although fewer companies are offering them.  If there is a gap between those sources of income and their spending plans, the difference is made up by using their retirement savings.

Running out of money is the single biggest concern of retirees.  The big question is how long we will live and the amount we can draw from our savings before they are depleted.

For simplicity, let’s assume: You’re ready to retire today and plan to have your retirement savings last 25 years. You’ve moved your savings into investments that you believe are appropriate for your retirement portfolio. The investments will provide a constant 6% annual return. You’ll withdraw the same amount at the end of each year.

If you saved this amount Here’s how much you could withdraw annually for 25 years
$100,000  $7,823
$200,000 $14,645
$300,000 $23,468
$400,000 $31,291
$500,000 $39,113
$600,000 $46,936
$700,000 $54,759
$800,000 $62,581
$900,000 $70,404
$1,000,000 $78,227

Keep in mind that these examples don’t include factors such as inflation and volatility that can have a big impact on your purchasing power and account value.

For example, if inflation were 4% a year, a withdrawal of $31,291 25 years from now would only be worth $11,738 in today’s dollars.

Investment losses would decrease your account’s growth potential in subsequent years. To account for these factors, you might need to save even more.

Many experts estimate that you’ll need 80% or more of your final annual salary each year in retirement. Social Security may only provide around 40% of what you need. And don’t forget that retirees typically have different types of expenses compared to people still in the workforce, such as increased health care and travel costs.

This is why planning is so important.  A financial plan will provide you with answers to many of these questions.  Retirees also need to reduce the chances that their portfolio will experience major losses due to market volatility or taking too much risk.  This is where a Registered Investment Advisor who is also a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) can help.  At Korving & Company we prepare retirement plans and, once you approve of your plan, we will manage your retirement assets to give you peace of mind.

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Taking Advantage of a Declining Stock Market Might Actually Help Your Retirement

savings questions

Saving for retirement is like a long journey.  On this journey, a declining stock market can work to your advantage if you take the opportunity.

A declining stock market is a chance to buy cheap; a time when stocks go “on sale.”  If the stock of a great company drops in price by half, you can buy twice the number of shares.  When it eventually recovers, you have twice the wealth.

“Dollar cost averaging” is an old technique that has been used by patient investors who put a fixed amount of money into their portfolios in good markets and bad.  It allows them to buy more shares when the market is cheap and fewer shares when the market’s expensive.

When workers put a fixed amount of money into their 401(k) plan this is exactly what they are doing.

Even people who are no longer adding money to their portfolios can take advantage of market fluctuations.  By rebalancing their portfolios regularly they buy more of what’s cheap and sell some of what’s expensive.

Taking advantage of these opportunities requires three things:

  1. Patience to view your goals from a long-term perspective.
  2. Keeping the emotions of greed and fear out of your investment decisions.
  3. Adding to your portfolio with regular contributions and strategic rebalancing.

Millions of people are using this approach to achieve their long-term savings strategy.  Using market declines to buy allows people to accumulate more money for retirement.  If you need help with patience, emotions, or investment strategies contact an RIA like Korving & Company.

Send for our free brochure: “Are You Ready for Retirement?”

 

 

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Is bigger really better?

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Everyone wants to see their business grow.  That’s true whether you own a small restaurant or an investment firm.  Some investors look at the size of the firm as an indication of the quality of the advice they will get, assuming that bigger is better.

But that is often the opposite of what they will experience.  Most people are aware that some of the best restaurants are small, with just a few tables, catering to a select clientele.  For the same reason, small investment firms are often better for their clients than large firms.

Large firms are the training ground for smaller firms.  Large firms recruit people who have no experience as investment managers and train them in selling their company’s products.  Once a financial advisor gains experience, he sees ways that his clients can be served better.  That’s the point at which he forms his own small firm where clients get the benefit of his knowledge and experience.

Clients who do business with small firms typically deal directly with the owners, who work for them, rather than employees who work for a paycheck.  As everyone knows, it makes a lot of difference when you’re dealing with the owner of a business rather than an employee.

Small firms are more flexible in meeting the needs of individuals.  Everyone is not the same.  Everyone has a different set of experiences, a different array of needs, and seeks a different level of service.  Large firms create policies and procedures that stack people in silos and try to impose uniform rules on everyone.  The larger the organization, the greater the need for uniformity and the less the business cares about any one individual.

If you have an investment portfolio worth a million dollars, an investment firm with assets-under-management (AUM) of $100 million will care about you and do its best to address your needs.  A firm with  AUM of $1 billion dollars will not care about you as an individual, you’re a statistic.

Korving & Company is growing Registered Investment Firm (RIA), but doing so in a way that makes sure that we always know our clients, care about them as individuals, and go out of our way to meet their individual needs.

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Pay No Commissions

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New clients to Korving & Company will pay no commissions on stock and ETF trades when they open an account with us between June 16th and December 31st 2016.

We use Charles Schwab as our custodian and Schwab has made this limited-time promotion to encourage new clients to open accounts with RIA’s like Korving & Company.

The promotion is called “Make the Move” and it’s designed to:
• Give you an opportunity to experience the value and benefits of working with us.
• Execute commission-free trades to offset the cost of realigning assets to one of our portfolios.

Contact us for more information.

Single Women and Investing

Women are in charge of more than half of the investable assets in this country.  A recent Business Insider article claims that women now control 51% of U.S. wealth worth $14 trillion, a number that’s expected to grow to $22 trillion by 2020.

Single women, whether divorced, widowed, or never married, have been a significant part of our clientele since our founding.  Widows that come to us appreciate that we listen and take time to educate them, especially if their spouses managed the family finances.  Once their initial concerns are alleviated they’re often terrific investors because they are able to take a long-term view and don’t let short-term issues rattle them very much.

Unfortunately, we have had women complain to us that other advisors that they’ve had in the past did not want to discuss the details of their investments and the strategy employed. Other women have come to us with portfolios that were devastated by inadequate diversification.

Our female clients are intelligent adults who hire us to do our best for them so that they can focus on the things that are important to them.  We are always happy to get into as much detail on their portfolios as they require.  Our focus on education, communication, diversification and risk control has led to a large and growing core of women investors, many of whom have been with us for decades.

Our book, BEFORE I GO, and the accompanying BEFORE I GO WORKBOOK, is a must-have for women who are with a spouse that handles the family finances.  Men who have always handled the family finances should also grab a copy and fill out the workbook.  If something were to happen to them, it would be a tremendous relief to their spouse to have such a resource when taking over the financial duties.  The first three chapters of our book are available free on our website.

We welcome your inquiries.

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Independent Wealth Managers vs. Wirehouses

If you had the choice, would you rather shop at a boutique or a chain store?  You know what you get at a chain store: pre-packaged products on shelves that meet most of your needs but no personal service.  A boutique provides you with a lot more product selection, a high level of personal service and saves you time in meeting your needs.

The reason that so many people go to chain stores for groceries, hardware and clothing is that they usually offer lower prices. The interesting thing about the financial services industry is that the “chain stores” (the industry calls them “wirehouses”) like Merrill Lynch, UBS, Wells Fargo are not cheaper than financial boutiques.

These boutiques go by other names such as “Registered Investment Advisors” (RIAs) or “Independent Wealth Managers.”   But they are all focused on satisfying their customers, not on the sale.  They are true servants to their customers.  While wirehouses give the impression of size, the are limited to selling the products they have on their shelves.  They can’t suggest you shop down the street for a product that’s better for you.  RIAs are fiduciaries, meaning they put their clients’ interests ahead of their own.  They focus on what’s best for the customer rather than the sale.

According to a survey by Cerulli Associates, over half of the ultra-high-net-worth clients still have their assets at wirehouses or bank trust departments.  That is changing as younger investors or the heirs of the older investors seek the kind of personal service that RIAs and Independent Wealth Managers provide.

If you’re looking for boutique service without paying more for it, contact us.

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The dangers of flying blind

I always loved flying.  When I was young and single I learned to fly a plane.  Taking off and flying was easy.  Landing safely was the hard part.    There was another danger for amateur pilots like me, flying without being able to see outside the cockpit.  The name for it is flying blind.

Professional pilots learned to fly blind.  They need to be able to fly in all kinds of weather, even if they are in clouds.  They call that “instrument flying.”  It means they don’t look outside, but read their instruments to complete their flight plans and land safely.  Amateur pilots, on the other hand, can get into serious difficulty if they accidentally fly into clouds.  If they can’t see outside they become disoriented.  It’s one of the most common ways that amateur pilots lose their lives.

When it comes to getting to their financial future, too many people are flying blind.  Over the last two decades too many people have seen their dreams crash and burn because they were not properly prepared.

Approaching retirement without a formal plan is like the amateur pilot who takes off in good weather.  Without noticing it he finds that there are clouds above and below him.  He can’t see out.  He becomes disoriented, not knowing which side is up, uncertain of his direction.  Now he’s flying blind and he’s in serious trouble.

What’s the best way to avoid this kind of trouble?  Two things are needed.

  • Make sure you have a plan that shows you a path to a safe landing.
  • Hire a “professional pilot” – a Registered Investment Advisor – who is experienced in navigating the hazards of the market and who won’t panic when the clouds move in.

Please contact us to see if we can help you land safely no matter what the weather.

Contact us for a free copy of our Investopedia article “How Advisors Can Help Surviving Spouses.”

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