GE Retirees health insurance

GE is one of the companies that are working hard to reduce the amount it must spend on retiree health care. As people live longer, the cost of lifetime health care coverage for retired employees becomes a larger part of a company’s bottom line. GE recently offloaded the supplemental insurance coverage for salaried retirees to another company that specializes in employee benefits.

With that in mind, here is what a member of the GE employee family had to say about this. Even if you are not a GE retiree, the analysis is very worthwhile.  (edited)

When you turn 65, Medicare becomes your primary health insurance even (I think) if you are still working for GE, and definitely if you are retired from GE. … [But] one needs to sign up for Medicare within 3 months before or after their 65th birthday month, or face a lifetime late enrollment penalty.

You can either purchase a Medigap plan on the open market using Medicare.gov to search the available plans, or you can use OneExchange the same way. Or, if you’re feeling lucky/healthy, one can just use the 80% coverage of Medicare Part B and go without a Medigap plan – after all, Medicare Part B pays 80% of Dr. visits…The Medigap plans basically cover the 20% of OV’s that Medicare doesn’t – plus a few other things, but that’s their primary role. A person could do a simple break-even analysis and figure out how many OV’s they would have to have in a year to equate to the premiums they will pay for a Medigap plan. A healthy person would actually be better off financially (in the short term anyway) without a Medigap plan, as most people are paying at least $100 per month per person for that coverage, I believe. Of course, it is insurance, so what you really hope for is that you pay the premiums and don’t need it, right?

Since you also would be losing your GE drug coverage, you very much would want to enroll in Medicare Part D, drug coverage, or you will be paying the retail price for drugs, without the coverage of the Part D plan, and also without the negotiated drug prices the insurance carriers receive – a bad proposition all around. If one’s prescription drug needs are modest, there are very low-cost plans available like Humana/Walmart, which provide good protection at very low cost. If one’s prescription drug needs are a little more exotic, then it would pay to explore which plan would be best, using the plan selector engine at Medicare.gov or OneExchange. My experience using both plan selector engines was they came up with a very closely matching answer. In my case, even with one Tier 3 drug that costs $250 per month retail, Humana/Walmart was the least costly plan, but several others were very close.

Or, if this person was OK with using a managed care plan, there is also the option of going with a Medicare Advantage Plan, or a managed care plan, aka Medicare Part C. Those are the plans for which we get the flyers every Annual Enrollment period. I think generally these are very cost effective, often covering Medicare Parts A, B and D with a premium of zero dollars, but you have to be prepared for the restrictions on where you can go and who you can use, you generally need a visit with a Primary Care Physician (PCP) in the HMO before seeing a specialist, etc. My view on these plans is that you give up some choice and control in exchange for saving quite a bit of money on premiums. But watch out for the geographical and network restrictions.

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