Working Longer May Help You

Via Mareen Hook of the HOOK LAW FIRM.

Well, science has now confirmed what intuitively we may have suspected. Working longer than the typical retirement age can benefit you, not only financially, but also with increased mental acuity. “For each additional year of work, the risk of getting dementia is reduced by 3.2%,” said Carole Dufouil, a scientist at INSERM, the French state-sponsored health research agency. The results shouldn’t surprise us. Experts have long advised older people to keep active physically and mentally. The study is particularly important, because it was a large one involving almost 1/2 million people in France. Usually, the larger the sample size of a study, the more confidence is placed in the results of a study. This is true of polling or whatever else is analyzed. France has accumulated quite a body of research on the subject, because of the interest and importance that its former president, Nicolas Sarkozy, placed on it.

The French scientists had a lot of information at their disposal, because of information that is collected by the state health system. They used the records of more than 429,000 people, most of whom were self-employed in trades such as baking and woodworking. On average, they were 74 years old and had been retired for an average of 12 years. These subjects were selected, because they had not developed dementia within 5-10 years of retirement. This meant that their results could not be attributed to the fact that those who decided to retire, did so because they were already showing signs of dementia at the time of retirement. While 3% of the subjects did have dementia, they found that, for each additional year of work, the odds of developing dementia decreased. For instance, a retiree at age 65 had approximately decreased the probability of acquiring dementia by 15%, when compared to a fellow retiree who left the work force at age 60. Quite impressive results which might have implications for mandatory retirement ages.

 

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